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时间:2020-05-27 11:44:16 作者:飞猪旅行 浏览量:66177

AG官网【ag88.shop】搜狐汽车频道 2DspLjBxText siz】eAaAaThese days, paying to \plan/t trees or inves】ting in g/reen projects as】 a way 】to balan\ce out your carbon emissions is a pretty stan\dard method o】f easing your en【vironm【ental conscienc】e. K/nown as car【bon offsettin\g, the process /has spawned a thriving business 】mak/i\ng billions of euros every year as com【panie【s /trade c】\a/】r【\bon credit\s to reach cli\mate c/hange g\oals.Yo/u can 】now even 】offset to und/o you\r own 】personal envi\r】onmenta\l damage, with a\irlines and organisat【ions offering /to he/lp you tak/e full resp【onsibi】l【ity】 for yo/ur 【residual emissions. For/ a small fee, o【/f \c/】\ourse. I【ncreasingly, however【, this s/ustain/ability】【 sol】u\t】io\n has come under】 fi【r】e from activists as being 】little\ more than/ gr【ee/n【washing. Criti【c/s have comp【ared【 \it to the practice of/ selli【ng indulgences\ /in the ancient Ca\tholic church; you can live\ h/ow】 you want as】 long as y【ou ha【ve the money/ to buy】 off your sins.What if, ins】tead of ma】king environmental protect【ion a side \issue, busine】ss】es made the\se 】kinds of carbon-】absorbing p/rojects a part\ of the new no【rmal/?Restoring biodiv】e\rsi【tyTi/】lmann/ Silbe】r, director 】of/ sustainable supp【ly\ chains】 for enviro/nmental expert, South P/ol】e, di【scus】ses how imp/\ortant a completely new approach c/ould】 be in allowi【ng b/【rands to show they/ are seriou【s abou\t fighting climate c/h/ang\e.“In/setting is derived from o/ffsetting【, as the name suggests,&rdquo】; Silber ex【plains. Wh/ere】 offsetting【 works to outso\urce to part】n】er 】\/organis】ations, insetting finds【\ ways to add/ /carbon miti/gating enterprises into t】he process of producing the product. “They would/ be looking for【 pr【ojects i\n or 【】close to their 】/supply 】\chain.”Convent】ional car【bon neutralising usuall【y i\nvolves investing in】 projects u\nre/lat\ed\ to【 produc】ts, b\ut insetting instead addr/e】sses a company’s balance wi\th \the\ ecosystem directly. B\urberry】, for\ example, recently announ【ced th/at it wou【ld b/e /partnering with PUR Projet 【to improve carbon ca/】ptur【e on farms run by their wool \producers 】in Australia. Restorin】g the biod】iversi\ty of these 】habitat/s helps cap/ture CO2 from the atmosphe【re /but also ensures th\e future of the land】scape.Where off】setting is re【active, makin】g changes】 internally is i/nte\n【ded【 to anticipate potent】ial negative s【oc【ial and env\ironmen【tal im\pacts before /they even happen. Ultima/tely the goa【l is to provid】/e a net p】osi\tive outcome.Burbe【/rry is helping to restore biodiversity fo】r】【 sheep farmer/s】 i/n Australia.U/nsplash【Is our addiction to Spotify ruini/n】g the planet? The【 environme/ntal \cost of st】reaming is\ invisi/bleS】yntheti】c palm oil bei【ng b】rewed 】like beer gets Bill Gates' inv【estm】entScie/ntists have work\e\d out \how to generate 】elect/ri/city fro/\m th【【in 【/airMak/i【ng important investmentsInsetting c/an be expensive to set u\p, but t】here is a range o】f/ benefits beyond\ purely financial【 rew/ards. “It improves【 /the resilience【 of the \supply \chain by investing/ w】her\e it is most vulnerable,&r【dquo; Silber says.\ Farmers and w【or【kers 【in areas where compa\nies set up p【rojects like this end up w】\ith greater security in thei【r/ i\】ncom】e, less/【 environmental po/llution, and【 regeneration o【f the ecosystem tha\t they rely on to \live.Bu【t big bu/si/nesses \have to work t【ogether with th\e people that\ g】row their material【s, to make s【【ure that these changes actually w/ork. &l】d】q【uo;There ha/s to be 【a p【artnership ap/proach, it’s not sust【ainable】【 to force farmers to make changes\,” explains Silber./ &ldqu/o;It’s not e\no】ugh to just make \it financ\ially\ attractive in the shor\t-ter【m, that m/eans a farmer sig】ns up for 5 to 【10 \years and【 the】】n stops doing it.”Feedback fro\m co【mmun/ities i/s essential【 to ensur\i/ng that i/nsetting is su】ccessf】ul.\ Unsustai【nab【le practice/s ca\】n【 be ex\ploitative 】and d/amagin/g to loc【a【l e\cosystems,【 pre【venting/ farmers \fr/om being \abl】e to ensure a secure income long-term. Making sure t【hat people feel they are being liste】ned t【o encou【rages th/em to\ continue\ fa【rming and pass on skills to future\ ge/n\erations. A positive mo【ve for local/ farmers, workers and for t【h/【e co\mpanie】】s employing them.So】 how cent/ral is ins【etting to a net】-zero future?】 】Silbe/r 】thinks it is definite】ly b【ecoming m/or//e】 mainst【rea\m, /whi】ch i/s good for e\miss/i【ons goals, b【ut it’\s risky and may\ not be possible for every】body. “Not 】everybody can move at the s/ame pa\ce wh【ich m/eans 】offsettin【g is still important,” he says. Technical skills f【rom more con/ven【tional emissions projects】 are also essential a】nd mea/n \th//at busine\sses end】 up working with many of the same /partners th】ey were bef/o\【re.Carbon i\nse【tting is about more th】an just \tree planting.Lukas\ Rodr/iguez/ PexelsIs inset\ting \just ano】ther way to plant trees?】Planting trees is just one way of b\ringing carbon】 emission absorbi\ng practices【 i/nto th【e su】pply chain. The idea/ could expand to include be/tter recycling facilitie/s, i/nves/ting 【in\【 energy ef/】ficiency o】r even projects impr/oving commuting 【options for employ\ees, a 】】paper\ by 】Eco\metrica\ sug\ges【ts. The【】se kind/s 】o【f changes a【/re lik】ely 【to b\e【 a lot】 \easier and cheaper to achie/ve,】 mak\ing them appealing to businesses /looki/ng t】o communicate their green crede/ntials.Often a ris/ky and expensive investmen【t/, however,】 \it 【could be a【 long】/ time be】fore re\gener/a【tive environ】men/tal projects become mainstream. In the near 】future\, buying a/bsolution by asking a company to offset your emis/si【ons will pro【ba/bly remain the approach for most. Ecometrica re】ckons tha】t thanks\ to the fact t\hat the/y become a part of 】the way a product/ is made,\ carbon inse\】tt【i\ng pr【ojects ar/e likely t】o be a better bet for\ 】sustainability in the】 lo/ng-term.Share this article More from lifeKKNQ

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FZj0More preparation time and p\eople obeying \con/finem/ent measures has helped Portugal manage its co【ronavirus o/ut/break, it's been claimed.Por】tugal h\as vastly di】fferent COVID-19 in【fecti\on and death rates/ com【pared /to【 n\eighbouring Spain, one of the \worst hit countries.【 Pulmonologist Dr【/ F/ilipe Froe】\s, an advisor to health chief Graça Frei】tas, said/ Portugal ha/d 】benef\i/ted 】f【rom being【 b/ehind Madrid in【 t/erms of the virus\'\ spread. Th\is, he adde】d, had given the/ country time to get hospitals ready【】 and \increase capacity in inte\nsi\】ve ca【re units."The differ【enc】e 【in Portugal was that we/ had more time to/ prepare," Dr Froes told Euronews' Good Morning Europ/e 【sho】w."We think we are three weeks behind】 Italy 】and pe】rhap【s one w\e/ek a/【【nd a half \behind Sp/ain, s】o thi【s gave【 us time,\ precious days, to prepare.\ I】 think\ the main differ】ence was\ also the early e/【n\gag\ement of primary ca\re physicians."Portugal】 declared 【a state of emergency o】n 18 March, just two da/ys after 【】the first COVID-19 deat【h wa\s reported.At the t/ime of【 】\writing, Portugal has confi】rmed 535 C】OVID-19 deaths, w\hich wo【rks out as 52 per one million】 o】f population.\ In Spain, m/ore than 18,000 have been /killed by the disease, giving it a r\ate of 385 fatalities for【 【each one milli【】on in\hab【itants.Madr\id's i\nfection rate is also double that of Lisbon's, al\though this measure can be skewed by ho【w muc\h 【test/ing a country c\arries out.Fr【eitas, Portug】a\l's \director general for health【, said /88 per c】ent\ of t/he country's confirmed ca\ses a/re s\taying at hom【e an/】d don'】t /re【/qu\i/re\ hospit【al treatmen/t. 【】"T】he \hospitals are not overwhelm/ed and we /have more t】ime【 and more [better] cond【itions to follow the c\ritical pat】\ients in the ICUs," she said."The data we have indicates that the maximum of our po/【tential ha【s not yet been r】eached,\ which reflects the evolution o\f /the epidemic.\"'【Unsurp/asse/d civic\ spirit'A study from t【h/e Nova Universit\y of 【Li/sbon indi】cates /the reproduction of C】OVID-19 in/ Port/ugal was 【 the low】es\】t in Europe during the first 25 day【s of the epidemic.Dr F/ro】es believes/ citizen ob\edien/ce has been cru\cial in 【prev】enting further spread 】of \the vir\us."【Most activities are closed,【 such\ as s【chools and commerci】al activiti】es, a/nd most people 【are 】usua\lly\ following the rules and we apply the \recommendations of th\e governmen【【t/," h【e 】said.Eduardo Cabrita,\ Portug\al's minister of in/ternal a】dmini/strati/\on, sai【【d Por【tuguese citizens 】showed "unsurpassed civic spirit" in com【plying with regulations\ over the 】Ea】ster weekend."S\ecur】it【y f/orce/s report very \lo】w levels of circulation of citizens \an\d widespr【e/ad a】dherence to recommend【at】i/ons."On Friday, Presi\dent Marcelo Re//】belo de】 Sousa pr/oposed /extending the national lockdown/ beyond 17 April, until 1 M/ay.Bu\t d【espite promising s【igns】, officials 【are/ warning it may st\ill be 【early to【 【e\val【uate Portugal's【 response to the coro/n【a】virus."The are/a of &\#8203;​housin】g 】in \residentia】l homes a【nd their workers】 is identified as o【f 】particular【 c【once/\rn 】and priority【 for a【ction【," said Cabrita.\Authorities fear the/ d\isease could sp】read rapidly through【 care homes as it【 has in ot/her/ parts of Euro\pe.B【ut Portug】al has take/n huge steps \to 】co【ntain the vi】rus, repatriating around 4/,000 citizens f\rom abro/ad.The Portug【uese go】v\ernment has also gran/ted citiz\en】ship】 rights/ to mi【grant\s and asylum seekers who have residency applications underway.The move was intended 】to ensur/e】 mor\e \people】 in the countr【y c/an access】 so】c】ial security and health care】.Share 】this/ articleCopy/paste 】/t/he article video embed\ link below:CopyShareT】w\【eetSharese【n/dShareTwe\etSharesendMoreHideShar/eSendShareShareShareSe/ndShare【Share【You might als/o lik】e 】 Coronavirus】 in Europe: Latest numbers o【n【/ COVID【-1【9 cases and deat\hs / 【【 / 】 】 / 】 】 \ \ Coron/avirus【 /in Eu\rope:【 Spain allows part】ial re】turn to wo】rk as casu【alty figures im/prove 【 \ \ 】/ 】Co【ronavirus【: Portuga\l/ 【grants temporary citize\nship /rights to migrants 【 【More aboutPortu/galCoronaviruslockd】ownEmer/genc【ySpainC【OVID-19Hot TopicLearn more\ about Coronavirus】 】 Hot\【 TopicLearn more about / 】 Coronaviru/s Browse toda/y\9【;s tagsjLOU

5CKpT【ext size】AaAaW】ith a p【icnic packed sa//fe\ly in my bag, awa【y from the enquiring noses of the many dogs I me/t along 【the route, I\ set off ac【ross Far\thing Downs and Happy\ V】alley to \explore the South L/ondon Dow/ns with the promise of a pub at th/e end o/f my 4 km wa【\lk. Almost immediately, I【 had to 【ste】p aside for a/ ra\pidly approaching horse 】and rider as they scrambled up 】the \cha\lk【 emba【nkment. Spr\awlin\g/ vie\ws of forest】s\ and sheep-dot/【ted fields were my reward as I /completed the short walk from Coulsdon S\outh St【ation up/h\ill\ to r【each \th【e top of /Farthing Downs. There is n\o doubt you are still within Gr/eater L】ondon; the rigid archite/ctu/ral figures of the City are a /jarring sigh\t amo\ngst the soft hills that frame /\them. 】It doesn’t feel like it, though, as yo/u de\scend into th】e valley and the nature\ reser【ve/ be/gins to envelop you in its lu【sh remoteness.Takin\g a break in Devilsden Woods&c】【/opy; Helene Je【unet/Eurone/wsWhilst in the process of pla/nning my walk I had discover///ed that this co/llection o】f parks is made up of 】multiple】 S\ites of Spe】cial Sci\】entific In】\tere/st (SSSIs), ext/【remely rare/ 【chalk g\rasslands that can/ be as diverse in species as a r【ainforest. The London Wild】life\ Trust st【ates that, thanks to changes in land use, an estimated 80%】 of th/is habitat has been lost in the/ last 60 ye【ar/s.On the hottest da【y of 2019 so far and just a week befo\re my vi】sit, \a s【peci】al ceremony we\lco【me】d this collecti【on o】f green spaces into London&\rsquo;s col】le】c】tion】 】of NNRs. This【 417-hectar\e area【 is teemi】ng with an a】stonishing quant】ity of species; Natural England's 【Adam Wal/lace/ said at the event that【 "there are/ o/ver 40 species p\e\r\ s】quar【e metre of p【lants that exist on/ this sort of site and/ th【at supports a huge range \【of wildlife."In a】 press release, Nat/ural England highlights that th\is will be Lo\ndon's t\hird reserve, the second lar\gest after Richmon【d Park. \Its】 n\ew sta【tus as an 】NNR helps to 【pre/s\erve o\pportunities for t【h/e /385,0【】00/ res】ide\nts of Croydon to have contact with nature/ and connect on a 【more persona【l level wi】】th a 】wild\er side of Lond\on.It&【rsquo;s not only the/ res【id】en/ts of C/roydon, however, 】tha\t【 will benefit from the protection of th】is【 outdoor sp】a】ce. Just a 30 minute trai【n【\ ride /from Victoria Stat【ion, it al【so】 offers an easy escape\ from t\h\/e stuffiness of Central London.Rel【ated 】| Et/hiopi/a breaks W【orld Record by planting 350 million trees 】in one dayPicnic in Happy Va\lley&c】/opy; Helen J】eunet/EuronewsI sat down to enjoy my picnic on a benc/h surro】unded by this ra】re gra\【ssland, overlooking Happy Valley. On th\e way throug/h【\ /Coulsd】on, I had stopp】ed to see i/f I could find some b\o】ok】s to help with iden/t【ifying 【th】/e 【c\arpet o【f flowers tha】t now \e\n】vel/oped】【 \me and was rewarded with/ some vintage ch\ar【ity sho\p finds. /They ma】\y n/ot have been the most up-to-date/ guides【 but their gorgeous illustrati【ons were almost as captivating】 as the real th】【【ing\. T】he o【ld books【 ca\m【e with the adde/d 【bonus \that, once I was done with 】them, they 】could be donat\ed back to the shop for anot】her explo/rer to enjoy withou】t the waste of buying new.【Secondhand bo】o】\ks including flo【/wer an\d t】r/e】e identifi\cat/ion guides&co\py; Helene \Jeu】net/Eu】ronew/sEven in the middle of a weekday afte/rno\on】, I found people enjoyi\ng 】the reserve \at】 e/very po】int /in my wa/lk. /As I was \t】aking photographs, /one man p【asse\d com\ment /to a couple sat wi//th him, &ldqu】o;ar【en’t】 you/ goin/g to take any to/urist pictures?” It /transpir】\ed that th】ey w/ere visi/ting f\/rom 】Spain, and he】【 ha】d b\【rought them out/ to experience the re【markable pla/ce /in which he li\ved.】More tourists, this time【 an Italian family, s】top】ped to a/llow me to take their pic】t】ure a【s they【 cycled through th\e par\k. On the gras/s a l/ittle【 way ahead/ lay a c】hildren&r】squo;s activi/ty book wi\t//】h the scribbli【ngs of【 an e\/ager insect enthusia/st cove\r\ing 】the pag】e,\ its】 owner 】de\【eply engrossed in the【 identification o【f an uncooperative butterfly several me】tres away【. Outs】i/de of】 your】 usual wal【k\ing】 and】 cycling】 routes, Friends of Farthing Downs lists a considerable number of bridleways/ around thi/s area/ e】ncompassing 】a range of \difficulti/es that offer alt\ernative views o【f the reserve for the keen \equestrian.】Identify flowers amo\ng【 t【he vast wildflower meadows&【cop/y; Helene Jeunet/Euronew】sI/t is th【is /\kind of engag\eme\nt with the env\】iron\ment that Cro//ydon Council, the City/ of【 London C/\orporation and Natural Eng【lan【/d hope will encou【rag】e the 【local p\opu】lation, and t\hose from further afiel【d, to h\e\lp keep this vital natural resource intact. Nature re/】cov】ery is beneficia【l to improving na/tional health \b/ut also as a pot】ential defence against th\e future\ effects of c【limate \chang】e, ac】cording to Tony Juniper head of N】atural England.】Views 【across Happy Valley chalk g/r】asslands&co\p\】y; Helene Jeunet/Euron【ewsR【el\ated | "Love Water" c【a】mpaign t【o enc】ourage Britons to look aft【er /waterwaysCresting another hill, the encroaching 】housing estates signalled that I wa/s 】nearing the end/ of my w\alk. 】In a field just bef\ore the path came 【t/o an e【nd,\ I foun\d volun】teers in the process of h【elpi【ng to r【/estore plant 【【life after years of ove【rgrazing by sheep and \rabbits. I s\】at \and watch】ed /them for a\ while, 【considering how this change in【 status affected the real\ity of the local area’s role f/or】 the community. Turning/ the South L/ondon Downs i【nt】o\ an NNR doesn&r/squ/o;t n/e/cessarily cha【nge an awful lo/t about 【experiences of the area; i【t d【oes】n't add any 】flashy visitor centres o【r adventure playgro【und】\s. What it offers most practically is/ greater, mor】e【 cohesive protection\【 for the fl【ora and\】 f【auna that make it so /unique. In t\urn,【 protected green sp【aces offer chances for 【improved mental and physic【al health in【 local population】s. But what \else?Woodland path/ways of m\any different kinds&/copy\; 】Helen【e 】Jeunet/EuronewsInclusion of another loca/lly import】ant green space int】o the \grou【p of【 2【2 NNR\s that 【e/xist 【\across the\ UK rea/\l【ly se】emed important /as I watched the volunteers. At the ev/ent\ that /declared its new status, Int】erim Chief Execut【ive of Nat/ural E【【ngland【,【 Marian Spain called the ar\ea 'part of【 /a national set of jewels】 i【n】 \the\ c【rown.'N】NRs are \managed by Natural England on beh】alf o/f\ the】 nation, often /by vo\lunteers like those I saw, for the benefit of the】 public.】 They】\ are for all o\f us/ 【【to e\njoy, to bring our】se【lves per/\sonally closer to n【ature an/d perhaps to】 better appreci/ate【【 t【he diverse magnifi/cen】ce【 of /the e/nvironment. It offers /re/】al, material proo\f of\ posit/ive【 environmental impact by hu/mans, pro/【of that we can 【effectively look a【fter the world we live 【in if\ we approach it in small chunks. In the face \of increasi\ngl【y negativ/e n/ews surr/oundi\】ng the climate crisis, t【he 】pr\e【se\r\vation o/f these na\tio\nal】ly im【p】or\/ta/nt 】plac/es】 【】/off【ers a sense of hope. It is an advert fo】r collec【tive action; if /we all 【w【o】rk together/【, things can change for the better.A well】 earned dri】nk【 at The Fox pu】b&co\py;\【 Helene Jeunet【/Euro】newsWi\th a/ happy glow that only a few hours spent outside can bring, 【I rounded】 the f】inal corner to the end of my a\dventu\re, The Fox,【 an 18th century\ 】v\illage pub very m【uch\ a【t home in【 the\ picturesque rural surroundings】 that had so 【absorbed me for th\e la\st【 4 km\. T\he p】ub was anyt\hi】ng but Vic\torian \in its offerings【【 with a vegan menu 】available, something I took full advan【tage of and ordered a dairy\ free\ d\esert to /coo/l【 \me d\own. I retired to the gent】le sun \of t/he busy】 g\/ar【den【, cold drink and coconut ice cream 】in hand, fee/ling tired but】【 satisfied with my Frid\ay【 afternoo\n escape 【from the city.Share this article 】 More from p【lacesVvv7

DxIW】Du\bai an/d the United Arab Emir/a】tes are making anima\l con/se】\rvation a government priority at a time /when b】iodiversit\【y is unde】r threa\/t /and more anima】l】s fa【ce\ extinction globa/】l/ly.A re】port by the United Nations\ earlier this/ year claim\ed animal extinctio】ns are at an unpr/eced【en【t/ed high. Acco】rding【 to t\he organi】sa】ti\on, as many as one \m/illi【on species are under threat.On a visi\t to t【he 】desert, you/ 】might expect to f】ind ca/mels or】 antelope】, 【m】aybe \some /hawks.\ But Du】ba】i&rs\qu\o;s A】l Marmoom【 animal sanctuary 【】is/ teeming with 】biodiversi【ty with hundreds of differ【ent /species of】 birds, m【a/mmals, and rept【iles】.T【he sa/nctuary covers 20 percent of t】he whole area o/f Dubai. In the begin】ning, 】it\ was a desert popula\ted b/y nati\ve a【nimals, bu\t as the san\ctuar\y【 exp/anded \t】o m\ore than 50 oases, it was discovered/ these water bodi\es/ could cont【rol the environment【al b\alan/c\e.The sa\nctuary has even man】a/ged\ to at】tr【act the Arabian O】ryx. Thi】\【s an】i\mal w【as declared exti/n【ct in t【he w/ild in 1972, but has now been br】ought back from the\ b\r【ink by the reserve.Saoud F\aisal is a wildlife o\ffi/cer \at the】 Al Marmoom sanctuary. He says in the 80s an/d 90s the Oryx /wer】e o【verh\unted for food. Now t】he animal】 is cons\i【dered part o\f the r\egion's wildlife/】.&ld/quo;They are to/tally protected now/ an【d also they are he【althy,” he【 explains. “We have them in【 large numbers whic】h last year reached【 more tha【/n 500."From deser【t 【oases to in\door tropical environments, recent laws in Dubai mean gre/ater g】ove】rnment【al support for animal sanc/tuaries.Laws were introduced in 2007 to cover 【anima\l welfar\e, but awa【reness r】e/ally s】tart\ed\/ to build in 2016/. The laws /also apply to \rare and exotic animals.\ Some are /looked aft\】er in anim/al sanct/uaries like Green Pla/net.Everything about Gree【n Plane】t w】as de/si/gned specifically to 【create 】the ideal habitat for tropical 】p【lants】 a】nd a【n/imals in】 t】he mid】dle of the D】ubai de【ser【t】.The sanctuary house\s a wid【e range o【f /spe/cies including many diffe/rent birds, and ma\mmals such as two-toed】 slo\ths. And lizards l】ike gree/n/ iguanas or basi\lisks.The latest】 addition t/o /the Gree\n P】lanet family is a male Slow Loris /named/ Lo】nely by staff. But t【his wide- eyed, rare pr】imat\e wasn&【rsquo;t【】 lon】ely fo】\r long.As【 he is a critica/lly e】ndangered animal, the search was on to fin/d 【him a compan\ion, \A couple /of months later, a /female【 Slow Loris of the 【【same】 specie【s was also res/cued. These animals【\ mate for 【lif【e 【and\ af/ter they wer/】e int/roduced to each 【oth【e/r【 a【ppea【red to 】get along w/e】ll,【 】raising/ hopes there may 】be a baby Slow\ Loris/ in the near fut\ure.Sh\ar\e this articleCopy/paste the article 【vi】deo 【embed link below:CopyShar/eT\weetShares/e/ndShareTweetS】ha】resendMoreHi/deShareSe【ndSh】areShareShareSe/n【dShareShareYou might also【 like\ 【 【 The appeti/te for local sustainable 】food【 /produce in the Un】/ited Arab Emirates 【 【 】 / / \ \ Dubai acts t】o ste/m the tide of single use pl【astic \ \ 】 【 \ New era 】for Benidor\m as resort embraces sustainabi/lity / /】 / Mor【e aboutEnvir/onment/al prot【ecti/o\nFa\una and FloraD】ubai United Arab Emirates Most viewed Beijing is their cam【\pu/s/: Inside the 【Ch\/in\ese capita【l’s li/fe-c】hanging/ study tour】s \ 【 】 【 \ 9/ places to vi/sit on your cul\tural trip around\ Croatia / 】 The Palm Jumeirah: Dubai's sy【mbol of creati【vit】\/y and ambition 】 Marke【ts,/ coffee an/d stre\/e】t art: d【i\scovering Zagreb's secret delights 】 / Gr【eek is】lands of history and culture 】 \ 】【 Browse/ today's tagsC2mb

Italian ban o\n】 p\lastic cotton 【buds comes\ 【/into effect

oDAGEnvironmental】【ists' anger after Hung【ary cuts d【own EU-protected for\es\tErBt

rLK1Ethiopia breaks world \record /by\ plan】ting 350 mil\lion】 trees in one day69wc

lgrgWATCH | From castles to cabins, \these homes/\ 】w【ere 】ma\de of wa】ste2CEf

axcDThe Eu/rop【ean Union 】h\as stepped i】n to help small /fi【】shing/ communities 】preserve/ their way of】 life, as y\oung people t\urn away from the job that their for】ebears 】d\id/ for generations.T【he Swedish-/speaking i【s】land commu/nity of Pellin/ki in southern Fi\nland is typical of those t/h【e EU 】is trying to hel/】p.For gen\erati】ons, fishing has been a respec/ted trade an】d a traditio/nal way of life for man/y famili/es. But today, t【he number of local fishers is dwindling. Only a few remain\.One r【e\ason is 】dec【l【/\ini【ng catch】es. The fishers blame an in】cr/easing number of 【predators: seals and cormorants \/】damage the c\age\s and dec】imat\e\ f\ish\/ 【stoc】ks.Good c\atches are no longer guaranteed, and t/\he\】 e】conomic surviv【【al of family-r】un fisheries is becoming increasing\ly uncer】tain.M\ost chil\dren from fi【shin\g families make 】a 】safer choice】 to/ leave/ home and study s【ometh【ing else.As their parents age and】 retire, small-sc/ale fisheries, once\ 【typical in Finland, \go ou【t /of busi/ness. Nationwide, the /numbe【【r of professional fishers ha】s decli\【ned in recent decades/ from 10 to aroun】d 400.【Twen】t/y-se\v】en-year-old Marie Kellgren has been fishing full-time fo/r m\or/e than four years, alt【hough she acknowl/edges that there are no】】t man\y like her."We&/rsquo;re \not m\any - young peop\le \fishing】. \I think 】it’s because it’s 【【physically hard wo【rk, and you don&rs【quo;t know for ho】w many years you c/an do \it. It's a bi【g risk to/ start."She in】itiall/y we【nt to stud】y t\ourism \in Helsink【i but then took up the op】por【tuni】ty of【 a local &ldq【uo;Master-【\【Apprentice" pr/og\ram to l【earn /t】he trade f\rom her /fat】her.\The】 EU-supported scheme provided a s\mall g】rant that allowed Marie to work for a year as an a/pprent】ice 】fisherwoman — without 】putting her fathe】r's business under any further fin】anci/a/l st【ra【in.My\ father 】is a fisherman, 【m\y father’s fat】her was 【a f【ish/erman, an【d my】 fathe】r's f【ather's father was\ a fisherman. /】 】 \ V】iking Kel\lgr/en 】 【 】 Her father, Viking, told Euronews: &ldq/uo;/】My fa\th【er is a fishe】rman, my 【father’s father w】as/\ a fi\sherman】, a\nd my father's f】at/h】er's \father was a\ fisherman. So M】arie/【 is the f【ifth gener】ation fishing here/."Th\e t\raining p/rogram included some th/eory an【d/ 】800 h】o】ur\s of fishing pra\ctice\."I lear】ned how to fish with nets and with trap\s, t/【o take care \of t】he fish, the catch, and to/ prepar\e, to 【salt a】nd to smoke and cold【-s】moke a\nd /make fishcake【s, and marke\tin【g, and all \o\ther st【uff about pay\ing 【b】\ills."The funding 【for the "Master-Ap【】p\rentice" pr\ogram wa【s pr\ovided main/ly by the Euro】pean Mar【itim【/e and Fishe】ri】es Fund, which supports generational rene/wal/】 in Europe's】 f/ishing sector. The idea came from \the local fishing comm\unity i\n Pellinki, when another aspir\ing fisherwoman, Tanja Åkerfelt, was struggling to enter the profess/ion."My fat/her didn&r【squo;t think th【at \was a 【go//od ide】a,” Tanja said. &ldq【uo;That&\rsquo;s when I had to 】talk to】 other fisher【m【en, won\de【r】in/g, how coul/d【 we do【 this.”O】ne /of the fishermen she【 sp/oke to was E】sko\ 】Taanila, who man】ages th/e pa/\rtnership /b【etw\een/ privat\e and public sto【ckhold】ers in】 the loc【al fisheries【【 se】ctor, kn【own as a FLAG &mdash】; Fis【heries Local Actio/n Group.Taanila came up with s/implified 】paperwork &mdash\; a formal【 contract and t/he 【tr\aining pr\og】ram\ for both the mas\t\er a/nd t【he\ appr\entice.Training a【 new 】fis【her costs around 6,000 e/ur/os. Esko says it's an ine【xpensive way to sustain【 professional fishing, which is the o】nly ye\ar-round econom】ic 【activity i/n the Pellinki are【a.T\h【e progr/am is helping to slo【\w the decli\ne of south\ern F/inland's fishing community — but/ it cannot reverse it.T【aanil\a 【said: &ldqu】o;Ever】y time 10 fis\hermen q【\uit, we get one or mos】tly two young peopl/e w\ho 】/are inte【re【sted in continuing."The progr【am has been running f【\or three years. Out of 15 app\rentices, 12 d【/ecided to \keep fishing professionally.That's a hi【gh succ【ess rat\e, but with the g/r】owing seal p】roblem and the fu】ture【 of fis/h s/to\cks uncer/tain,】 these/】 ef/for\ts might not be enough."We 】hav\e to get \new fisherme\n because/ the avera/ge age here is 60 years o/ld,&rdquo\; said Ta/an】il\a. &【ldquo;So if\ \we do nothing, 】it】 wi【ll】 //take only【 five or six years and everybody wil【l have quit. It is ve\ry important that\ we have a【 living fishery in【 ou/r coastal areas.】 Without tha/t,/ it c【ou\ld be a dead ar】ea. And that&\/rsquo;s not n【ic/e."Much furthe【r south, off the coast of the Belgian port of Ostend, the fishing 【tradition is thriving and u\【ndergoi/\ng/ a renewal.With its limite【】d coas\tline【 an/d only six d\oze【n\ fishing vessels, Belgium is\n't a big fi【\shing】 country /—】 but in coastal 【West Flanders/ province, f【ishing tradi】t/ionally played an importan【t role.A lo/cal maritime \scho\ol &ndash【; the Maritie【m\ Instituut Mercator – runs\】 a ded/icated training ship, \wh【ich was renovated with EU he\lp.Built\ in 1967/, the "Br【o\odwinner", /a beam tra/wler, was refi/tted to provide bett】er safety and a gr/eater level of comfort than on t\raditional】 ve\】ssels.Bart DeWae/gen\ar/e, \a teacher at/ t【he Maritiem】 Insti/tuut Mercat\or, said s】tudents get\ esse\ntia/l hands-【【on training. Most of th/em d\on't have the se【a in their blood."I 【think maybe 20 per】 ce\nt are from】 familie/s that did it bef】ore, and 80【 per cent don’t【 even know anything about it. The】\y come/ from big /cities lik【e Antwe/rp and 【B\russels, no\th】】i【ng to do\ with t【he s\ea.&rdq】uo;Stud【ent/s go on eight-hour f/ishing trip】s sta【rting \fro【m the age of 12. By\ 16, 】t】hey spend】 hal】f 】o】f th/eir school ti】m】e at sea.Along with var/ious f/ishing-related skills, they learn navigati/on and marine engineerin【g.Most are /seeking a job in the maritime\ sector,】 but not necessarily in the fis/hing industry, 】where the work is har/d and the/ risk of accidents high./Sami \Tebbouche\, a student, said: "Y】ou 】have to learn to sail the vessel on your own】. You have to wa【ke up at night to repair \t\he net/s. It's tough!"Another student, Seppe DeKinde】r, said the unpredictable n】ature of th】e job】 puts many young 【people off. Fishermen's salaries can be ver/【y high - or low, depe】nding on the catch."It&r【squo;s unp\redictable ho【w much】 you ca【/n earn\ sometimes. That&/rsqu\o;s why a lot 【of p】eople are uncerta【in i\f\ they rea/lly/ want to do it/】. And /also becau【se it’s really h】ard wo】rk. And a【 lot 【of p【eople \have k】i/d\s a/nd stuff, and they don&rsq/】uo;t want to【 leave them behind."\In the 1980s, five vo/cati\o\nal】 sch【ools【 】tr\ained 3【00 pupils a /year to wo】rk in fisheries. Today, only o\ne【 【sch】ool wit【h 40 students 【remains.Teache/rs say /that in the modern era, even high salar】ies and improved【 【/working conditions are n】ot enough to /ma【ke fishing attractive for【 yo【ung peopl】e.The scho【\o/l’s headmaster Jac【ki/e Scherrens said: "I\n th】e /p【ast, when they/ 】were, for example, two weeks at se】a, three days in the 】harbour, but from the th【ree da【/ys yo】u had 】to work】 two \days, and that was no problem. Now, when they a/【re, let&rsquo\;s say, /e/ight day】/s a】t sea, 【four days in /h】arbour, and/ you ha】ve to work one【 or two \days/ &m/d】【ash; they don\&\】rsquo;t wan【t that anymore! S/o it&rsquo\;s【 very difficult【 to attract you\n【g people for it."There /\are hopes th【at/\ si】x new vessels about to】 enter the Be/lgian fis】hing【 fleet will revive interest i\n the profession.1212121【】2121212121Shar\e this a【rticleCopy/pas\te the a/rticle video embed link below:CopyShareTw/eetS】【】】har】esendShareTweetShar】esendMoreHide【ShareSendShareShareShareSendSha】reSha\reYou/ might also l/ike 】 【 /\ The importance of re【sto】ring ma/rine【 b/iodiv】ersi】ty \ 【 M\o/re a【boutFishery/YouthOceanEnvironmental【 protection/ 】Most viewed /\ 【 \ / 【 What i【nfluence on climate is 】the coronavirus lockd\own rea\lly having? 】\/ 】 The new AI system safeguar\ding premature babies from infecti【on \ \ 】 / 】 Mes【sen\ger RNA: the molec\】ule that may teach our bodies to beat cancer 【 【 / 【 【 Apple and Google say t/hey'/;l\l work together /to t】ra/ce spread of //【c\or\onavirus via s】martphones How EU fundin\g is/ cha/nging \the face of Latvian innovation 】 【 【Brows】e today's【 tagsPoEe

RoK5Tourism set to bl\oom in Angola’s desert region6vPO

gApC“Time is running o/ut”, stres\sed Carolina Schmidt, Chi】l\e’s Environ【men\t and Climate Minister, /in a /】video 【ad\dress before 2019&】rsquo;s Cl】/imate Conference COP25 la\st Decembe【r. &ldqu【o;There can【n【ot be 】an effe/ctive】 global res\ponse/ to clima\te cha\nge withou\t a global response o】n\ ocean/ i/ssues,&rdquo/; she added.】 Ocean issues range widely, fr【om sea【-level rise a\nd lo【ss【【 of 】oxygen, to incr】eas/ed water temperatures and ch【anges thr/ou/ghout e】cosys【te】m【s. The Inte【rgovernmental 】Pane\l 】for /Cl/imate Chan【ge&rsquo/;s (IPCC) sp【ecial report on the s\tate// of the oc】ean\s f/eatures worrying future t\rends, while last 】year\, the heat in the oceans saw the highest value/ /ev】er recorded.Ocean aci】di【f\ica】tion 【u【ndermines the integrity of m【arine ecosystemsOcean a\cidifi【c】atio】n is the phenomenon in wh【ich o/ceans are becoming】 mo/re/ acidic, as they /conti【nu】e to a【bsorb more and 】more of carbo】/n in the atmosphere/, which is【 increasing due \to h】uman-produce】d emissions. In the】 last 200 years, about 30 percent【 of those\ total emissions have\ been gu】lped by\ the ocean, and 】today, sea wat/ers st\ill/ take in a【bout 25【 percent annually.Ocean acidification occurs when seawater rea【cts/ 】w】i【th the CO2 it ab【\sorb【s from t/he 】/atmosphe/【re, prod】ucing// 【more acidity-【inducin】g chemicals while redu【ci/ng important 】minerals - such as calcium c【\arbonate - that marine organisms rely on to /survive】.The oceans’ average s】urface ac/idity, ra【ther stable over millions of years, h\as increased by about 26 percent i】n the last 150 years. “It】 【was a very slow rise unt/il the 1950s, but】 from /then on\wards, acidif】icatio/n gained spee】d,&r】dquo【; sa\ys Dr. J【ean-Pierr/e Gat【/tu\so, researc】\h di】r\ector at the Laboratoire d'Oc&eacut\e;a【n/ographie de Villefranch】\e, CNRS and 【the】 Univ【ersity】】 of Sorbonne. “Since man-m】ade CO2\ emiss【/ions are【 the/ main cause of /\acidification, fut】ure proj】ections depend on their 】levels. In a bus/】【ines】s-】as-usual si】tuation, ocea【n acidification c】ould /i/ncrease by anoth】【er 150 percent by 】2100,” a\dds\/ \Dr. Gattuso.With 9 perc/ent of th】e ne\ar-surface ocean affe】cted by fa】lling p】H, aci\】dification eff】e\cts are incre/asing】ly felt globally,】 across【 a wide range of marine \ec】osystems. “The worl\/d seems to be/ ob【\sessing ab【out what is happening on land【【 and in the atmosphere, no【t realis【ing that li\fe on Ea/rth is wholly a 【s】ubsid】ia/ry of t】/he ocean, that 【a【ccounts for 98 【pe】rcent o/f species on the planet,” says Dr. 】Dan 【Laffoley, M/arine【 Vi/c\/e 【Chair 【on IU【CN&【rsquo;s Wor【ld/ Commission o/n Protecte【d Areas and【 Senior Advisor \Marine Science and Conse\rvation 【for its Global】 Marine and Polar Progr\amme. &ld【quo;What was/ predict\e】d [about acidification] back i\n 2004 as\ something we needed n【ot\ to w\orry abo\u/t until 2050 or 207Our s【eas a】re 【facing increasi】ng competition for spa/ce and reso/urces — between o\ld sectors, su【】c\h as fishing, and new, such as offshore wind farms.\T/his compe【tit】ion can\ lea】d to \c】onfl/icts.\ Uncoordin\at【ed use of marine space al/so【 threatens the he】alth of the oc【ean, adding to\【 the destructive \effects of c】limate/ c】hange.P/rote【cting the ma\r【ine e/nvironment, re/d/ucing conflicts and e\ncouraging investment are t【】he aims of maritime 【spatial planning【, or/ MSP &m【dash; a proce/\ss th/a【t puts economic ac\tiv\ities and ecosystems on a map. Aut\horities \and stakeholders work together, developing plans at local, national an【d t\rans\national levels.It’s /essent/ial that different economic \sec/tors, a\gencies a【nd governments cooperate fo】r the proces\s to 【/be】 successful. The European Commission and IOC-UNESC\O ar】e d\evelop】ing int【ernati【onal gu/idelines to promote m/ari\time spatial】 plann/ing around the world.The】 goal /is to trip】le the marine a】re【\a benef【iting f【rom MSP by】 】2030, covering【 30 per cent of m\aritim\e area/s under【 national j】urisdiction.Shar】e this 】articleShareTweetShare】send】S/hareTweetSharese【ndM【oreHideShareSendShareShareShareSen】dShareShare/More a\b【outOceanEnvironmental /protec/\tionFish\eryPortugal360° vi】deo \ Most viewe/【d \ 【】 / 】 / What influence on climate i】s】 the coronavirus lockdown r/eally having? 【 / 【The\ new AI system 】safeguarding \【premature bab【ies from/ /i\nfecti/\on / 】 // / / Messenge\r【 RNA:\ the molecule that may teach our bodies 【\t】o beat cancer\ 】 【 / Ap【ple and Google sa】y they'/【;ll work \together to trace sprea\d of coro/navirus via sm\ar】t【phones / / 【 How EU funding is changin/g the face \of L/atvian\ innovatio/n】 】 】 \ Browse to\day's t】ags 【is happening now.&rdqu】/o;Cutti/ng /the water&/rsquo;s amount of carbo/nate i【ons】 robs a w【ide range of /mari】ne animals of the vita】l material t/hey n/eed t】o 【build protective shells. Mussels, pla\nkton, or\ reef \c】or】als are /some o】f the main sp\ecie/s u【/nder】 threat, multiple s【tudies show./Tropical 【coral reef\ ecosy】stems oc/cupy less t】han\ 0.1 per【ce/nt\ of the o【cea【n floor, but between on\e and/】 9 millio/n species live in and around them. As scientist/s p/\redict 】that calcium car\bonate 】】will drop by the end of【 t/h/e cen【tury, halv【ing its pre-industria\l con/centration across the tropics, /scientists a】re wo】rried that 【corals m\igh【t switch from building to dissol\vi/ng mode. While they might not shr】ink, oc/ea【n ac】idification a】lone 【might lower 】the densit【y of their s\kel】etons, by as much a\s 20 percent by 20. Aci/dific【ati】on weakens/ reef\s facing furth\er /p\ressures from b\leaching-\inducing heatwaves, \as well as economic act】iv/ities\. “We are/ w\eake】ning their repair mechanisms,&rdquo】; says】 D/r. Laff【ol\】e/y. \In【 the ne/xt 20 years, scientists s\ay that】 coral reefs /are lik【ely to degrade f】ast, chall\/enging the l\ivel/iho\o\ds of 0 million people depending \on th】em for food, coastal prote\ction and income.Acidification al/s【o affects deep-water corals\ – such 【as those in the North Atlantic &ndas】h; whi【ch are biodiversity hotspots, critical hab\itats for thou】sands of species,\ \including commercial ones, s】u\ch as shrimps, lobsters, cr\abs, groupers,/ and snappers. “Their skeletons are being eroded /in】】 the same manner as o\steop】or/os\is is weakeni【ng ou/r b\ones/【,” says Dr. Laffoley.A phe】nom/enon not yet\ \fully under】stoo\d\“There are observations of ho\w ocean acidificat【ion【 im\p/ac/ts certai/n species,\】” says/ Dr【. Helen Fi【/ndlay, biol【ogical o【ceanographer at the【 Plymouth Marine La【boratory (PML),\ which uses Copernicus Climate Cha【nge Servi【ce (C3S) data and 【infras\tru/cture to estim】ate the \ocean\】’s pa/st and fut\ure aci【d【ity. These impacts are m\ore often 【asso\ciated with ocean regions where 【deep waters &ndas】h; which 】naturally t/end to be more acidic &nda/sh; r/is/e to the surfac/e, boosting acidificati【on regionally, explains Dr./ \】F【i/ndlay. For instance, acidic w【at/ers d\ama\ge o【r d】【isso/lve the shells\ of plankt/onic 【sea snails, important feed for fish such as salmon.But /【s\tudies have show\n spec/ies can respond in mixed w】ays. Some might benefit from acidification, as well as f【rom ocean 】warming, and /inc【reasingly p/redate other sp【ecies,\ IP\CC experts cla/im. Across ecosystems, microscopic marine algae – 【or ph\ytoplankt/on, the b/asic feed /o】f many 【marine food webs/ &ndash】;【 【m/ig】\h】t suf\fer or flo】urish in more 【acidic seawater. Satellite 【data on ocean co【l【o】ur from the Copernicus Marine Se【rv【ice can provide【\ a closer look a\t the oc\ea/n&】rsquo;s 】C/O】2 uptake and how the marine food】 chain mig/h\t react.“Th】e Copernicus Cli/ma【te/ /Change (C3S) Marine, Coastal a/n/d Fisher】ies (MCF【) Sectorial Information System (SIS) project has【】 produced\ a series o】f marine envir】o\n】ment clim\/ate imp/\act/ indicators\, including several \re/lev\an【t to ocean ac\idification, a【long with a number of too【ls that demo【nstr/ate how th\e indicators can be used in marine applications,&rdq【uo; 】says Dr. James Clark, s】enior scientist at】 PML/【. “A majo【r goal of the project is /to produce a 【set of products that su\ppo\rt Eu\ropean climate change【【 adaptation str\ategie】s and mitigati【【on policies. Indica【tors from the CS-MCF project are being incorporated in【to the C】3S /C】limate Data【 S】tore, and a】re expected to 】g【o /live in the next few wee】ks.&】r【dq/uo;/Impac\ts on /biod/iversityEffects of the 】same】 phenomenon may take different faces across r【egion【s/. Throu/g【/h the mid-2000s, the U.S.&】r【squo;s Pacific Northwest began seeing dramatic】 oyster d/ie-o/f】fs in【 hatcheri【es, as th【\e larvae were affec】te【d by acid/】ifie【【d waters; the vital 【coastal shellfish/ industry was h/i/t\ 】hard. In Canada, scientists e/xpe】ct acidification\ on the Pacific c【oast to 】/give way to increasingly toxic algae】, compromisi\ng shel【lfish, and a】ffect\ing even fish, seabirds and marin【e mammals. 】They also anticip\ate one species of fish-killing a/lgae might wi/n more territo/ry in mo/re】 acidi\c wate/rs, threatening loc【al salmon aquaculture】.In Eur】ope, big mollusc producers】 on the A【tlantic 】】coasts】/ like Fran/ce, Italy, Spain, and the UK are 】expected t/\o 】suffer the most【 from acid】ifica】tion impacts by the 】end】 of t\he century. Data from \t\he Co【pern/icus Marine Se/\rvice, which recently includ\【ed sea】water】 pH am】【o\ng its】 ocean m/onit/ori\ng indicators】, is/ used】 by res【/ear\chers【 to gain a better under\stan/ding 】of how acidifi】cation evo【lves in 】European waters./Acidification effects in/ the A【r】ctic also worry scientists, some predicting that its \【waters wil\l lose its /shell-building ch\em】\icals by t】he 20/80s. Still, there are o】nly spotty measurements of oce】an【 acidification i】n the A\rctic, points o\ut Dr. Gattuso, due to its hars\】h rese/ar\ch condit/io【ns. \&/ldquo;W\/hat we do know】 is that /Ar【ctic wate/rs are natu\/rall/y mo【re【 a【/cidic – as CO2, li/ke \all gases, dissolves much faster in cold \water. We worry【 that in about 10 percen/t of the\/ A【/rctic’s o/cean s】urface, the 】pH is so low tha/t the \water is b】ecoming corrosive to organisms/ with shells,” says D/r. Gatt\us【o.Changes 【in ocean physics\ and chemistry a\nd impacts o】n organisms and ec/osystem service\】s according to /str/ingent 【(R【CP2.6/)/ an\d/ high bu【sines】s-as-usual 】(RC【/P8.5) CO2 emissions scena】rios.Source: Scie/nce Mag】 “The prob\lem【 is we are really asking for trouble by changing\ t\】he fu】nction\ality of the ocean,&r】dquo; says Dr. Laffoley, who highlights that 【th】e mix of acidificatio\n,\ ocean wa/r/ming an】d lo/ss o】f /oxyge【/n i\n the water】 is weake【ni】ng t【he overall system, with poorly u】nder【sto】od consequences. “The scale and the /amount【 of carbon a\nd h】eat going into the\ ocean is j】ust truly j】aw-dropp/ing. It&rsqu/o;s a\ proble【m that we 【are】 rather storing up than r】esolving it./” Reversing acidif】ication i/mpac/ts on ecosyst/ems?【“We have already\ commit】ted 【to ocea】n a【/c】idif\ication to its current levels and beyond【, through the amounts of】 CO2 emi/\tted,\” says Dr. 】Fin/dl】ay.】 &ldqu】o;T\he onl\y certain approach is mitigatin\g CO2 e【missions,\&rd【qu】o; say】s Dr. Gattuso. “It w\ill take\ a long time to go back to【 the preindustri\al stat/e, but we can /stop oce【an acidification./”Scie【【nce\ i【s exploring solut【【i【ons, but their 【effects on\ e【cosyst\ems and oce\an pr\oce\sses are not yet fully unders\tood. \Some oc\ean-based 【climate change fixes don/&rsq\uo;t t/arget directly oc\ean acidifi【】cation, while】 others might not be very efficient at\ lockin/g away the carbon. However, 【“more researc】h is being done 】to investiga\te ho】w 】we can use macro\algae, sea-grass b】eds, man】gr/oves, et】\c to st【/ore c】arb】on and also to lo【cally/ ease ocea\n acidi【fica/tion,” says Dr. Findlay\.Adapting fisheries to ease t/he pr【e/ssures o/n ecosystems 【may also provide a way to live with ocean acidification. For\ exampl【【e, 】C3S and PML are com\【】bining wh【at mod\el【s/ say abou【t potential ef\fects of 】c】【limate change on Europe/an s【eas with 】speci/es inf\ormation /to f\oresee how fish s/\toc】ks mig】ht /change/ and【/ how ind/【ustri\es and people depending\ on fisheri】es need to ada】pt./ /“The C3S data will】 be/ used to identify /areas of opportunity【, such as】【 increases in number\s of some fish species\, a【s we/ll as risks, such as dec/lining fish stocks\,&\rd】quo; says Dr. Clark.\ &】ldquo;As/ a\ \result, the sector will be able to mitigate the effects of climate change 【by p/lan【ning sustainable fi/shing practices./&/】rd【quo;Identifying which pa/rts o】f the【 oce】an need u【rgent conserv】ation cou\ld】 al【so help ecosystems mit】igate aci【dification. Experts have been map/ping c/ritical marine ecos】ystems to spot\ where protected\ areas should be /created or \exte\n/ded. &l/dquo;We can h/ave /places【 【where we take th】at\ pressure off, so we give/ areas of the oceans the be【st\ h】ope 【of ri\din【\g\ out the cha【llen\ges that they face \while we go ab/out reducing CO2 emissions,” s【ays \D】【r. La\ffoley.Share this /articleShareTw\/ee/tShares\endSha/reTweetShar/esendMore/Hide\ShareSendSh】areShare】ShareSendShareSha/reMo】re aboutGloba】l 【warming and climate\ changeOceanEcosystemEnvironmental prot\ecti/onP\artne【r: Copernicus 【 【\ Most 】viewed \ / / / What】 influence on climat【e// is the coronav\ir\us lockdow\n really havin】g? 】 \ The n\】\ew 【【AI system safeguarding prem】ature\ \ba/bies from infection 【 / 】 / 】 \ Messenger RN【A: the mo【lecule that may teach ou【r bodies to b】eat canc\er \ \A/p【ple and Google say/ they'll 】work tog【ether to t\race spread of coronavirus via smart/p】hones \ 】 【 \ How EU funding is chang【ing \the face o】f Latvian innovation \ Browse toda\y�【39;s/ tagsjBEv

IW2kGree【n festival: partying conscio/】usl【y at Sziget Festival9gqA

3sntZoom\ing in on t【he】 future of el\ectric moto】rcycles6Rxy

ghTCPush to /restore one of 【Europe's/ o\ldest Rivers3J1A

uHn3T\ext sizeAaAaFr【【om food 【wast/e to/ woodchips, a wide sel【ec/tion of surprising 【raw material】s can end\ up s【erv/ing as an alternative to plastics. Th】ey can be biodegradable in/ just a few months or even c/ompostable as opposed】 to the synthe\tic plastics, which stays \with us fo\r sev【eral【【/ h】\undreds【 of years in 】the\ landfills and release\s a lo\ng list of toxic che【mi\cal【/s /into our env【iron\m/ent. Rec/ycling can help ease some of these proble/ms\, but th【e be】st solution seem\s to 【repla/ce t【hem with more eco-f】ri【endly m】aterials】.However, some bi】od/egradable plastic has already attracted critical rem\a【rks, such as the one made from hemp and/ co\rn starch 【a【mong ot/hers. There are debat/es that pro\ducin】g these can resu/lt in a】】n even /greater amount】 of pollutants】,【 due to the pro\d】uctio/n with fertilizer【s and pe【sticides as well as the chemical p/rocessing】 nee【ded to】 turn organic material int\o plastic./Living 【it m\ade a selection of【 some recent】\ innovation/】s, w/hich need no land 【and no pesti】cides t\o produce,/ 【as ma/inly usi【【ng what is given by nature.Fr【om seaw\eed to biod//egradable plasticLiv】ing it rep\orted 【earlier\ abo【ut researchers, who have devised a possible solution/ for dur\able plastic waste, 】i/nspired\ b\y the oce//an. Scienti【sts \at Tel Aviv Univ】ersity have created a biodegradabl】e plastic by cultivating natural polymers made by micro-organisms t/h】at feast on 】se【a【weed al\gae.Or【/ganic plastics f/ro/m avocado s\eedsAvocado seeds are a h/uge industrial /waste 【in Mexic】o, henc】e a lo\cal c【ompany/ came【 up\ 】wi【th th/\e idea of【】 giv【i\ng 【them a \/second life\ as biodegrad/ab/le plastic. Biofas】e today produces /avocad【o【 seed 】stra【ws a//nd cutler\ies. Accor/ding to th\em, as i/t is foo【d w】aste, it/ reduces the costs/, so\ th】ey claim that they\ can produ\ce it for th\e same pri】c\e as】 regula【r palstics.The precious material in l】o】bsters' exoskeletonS/he\llfish, such as lobste【rs, could o/ffe/r a solution to the scourge of si【ngle-use plastic thanks to a bio-polymer in their shells called chitin. 】A London/-based startup The Shellworks is developi【ng\ a met】hod to transform thi/s material -】 normall/y destine】d\ for the 】rubbish\ /\ti【p - 【into】 a novel bioplastic that/'【s\ both biode/grada】ble and recyclabl】e.Click on t【he video a】bove to learn h【ow l/o【bst/ers can provide an alternative \for single-use p\lastic.Share this\ article More from lifesRPb

OrmyWhy I quit my job at Vogue 】to li/ve in a tree for a yea/rx3YR

LmksIn Pic】tu【res:】 Deforestation in Brazil's rainforest\【 】【is close to five time/s the size of Lon\don\e7Gl

FAOi【London's \ne】w natur【e res】erve has as mu【ch biodi\v【ersity as 【a rainforestupIE

WVipText s\izeAaAaAlt】hough he wa\s only born in 1984, Hung/arian G\&a//acut\e;bor M【iklós Szőke is\ al【ready a promi/】nent artist of the contempor【ary \sc【ulpture scene in Budapest/\. His main a【rtwor\k/s are public an/imal】 /sculp\tures, \noticeable for】 their “lath-style” and enor/mous si/ze. He prefers to\ work with stainless steel an/d hardwood 】ra】th/er /than traditional marble and bro【nze to give/ his art a more "mo】dern aesthetic"\.The A】tlanta Falcons recently c/ommis】sioned/ the arti\st t/o erect a giant falcon 【statu【/e in time for【 the open/ing】 of【 their n【ew Mer【cedes-Benz Stadi/\u【/m. /With a wingspan of\ /21 meters\ and a heig/ht/ of 13/ meters\, 【the mas】sive stai\nless steel sculpture \【is now the largest bird re/presen/tation in the worl【d. “Calo\/ssus” in Samo【rin \is the larges\t equine st】atue】 in \Europ【e. Other sculptures\ 】by G【ábor can be found arou/nd the world fro】\/m 】Gstaad\ to \Bahrain, 】Washi】ng\ton\ D.C. \to Niz【h/ny Novgorod. View/ this post on In】stagramMa 4 é【ve avat【tuk sz&ia/cute;vemhez egyik legközelebb álló szobromat, a 】Frad\i sa\st, Európa le【gnagyo【bb á】l】l/and&\oacute; k&o/】uml;ztéri mad&aa】cu\te;rszobr&aa】\/cute;t, am/elyet a vilá】\gon sz/in【te mindenhol】 ismernek. A】z a szeretet és b&uum/l;szkeség, amit szobromo\n \keresztül a\z&oacu【te;ta is k/apok nap, mint n\ap, felbecsülhetetle\n, 】e】zúttal kösz&】ouml;】nöm! Hajrá F【radi! ?【???【 #ftc #eag】le #hajrafra/di #gaborms【zoke 】#bud】apest #hung/aryA post shar【ed by Gabor Miklos Szoke, Art\ist (@gab/ormszoke) o\n Aug 9, 2018 at 4:25am PDTIt’s 】【not a surprise /H\ungar\/ian 【media call\】 him “H/un/gary/&rs/quo;s \coolest export” a\nd that he made it into Hungarian Fo\rbes】 Magazin】e&rs】quo;s “【T/op 10 under\/ 30&rdq\uo/; in 2015, or t/hat he has received】 numerous national and international aw【ard【s. Despit】e all the 【success at suc\h a young age, G【&aacu【te;bor never 】/forg\et【s that his sculptu/res are not just about inst【antl/y recogniz\abl】】e 】shape】s and shee\r magnitud/e. View 【this post on InstagramRise Up! /T\his mott【o【 can\ best /desc/ri/be】\ m【y sculpture\, the A/tlanta Falcon! S/he is proud, f】ree \and authoritative at the\】 same time.】 \I c】a】n't wai/t/ t【o see her again! 】???? @mercedesbenzstadium #amb】se #mbs\art #merc【edesbenzstadium #atla【ntaga/ #sbliii #【atlan】t/afalcon #touchd/own #momen【t\ #riseup #publicsculpt】ure #】arr【 #desi\gn #co【ntempor/arya/rt #gabormszok】e #\【atlantafal】con/ #at】lantafal\cons #superbowl #【superbowl【53 #sbliii #a【tlantaA post shar/ed by Gabor Miklos Szoke, Art\i】st (@gaborm【szok/e\) o】n Jan 28,】 2019 \at 8\:03am PST【We sat d/ow\n with him and Berta Hauer, his\ man\ag【er and partner, /in】 their i【mpr【essive stu/dio locate】d \in/sid\e an 【】abandoned/ /f【actory in the/ south o/f Budapest, wh\ich won the d\esign of【fice of th】e year award in Hun】gary /i\n 2016,【 t【o \ask what's the message be】hind/ his ar\t. View th【is post 】on InstagramDante Imperium Part】y in the G【abor\【 M. Szok【【e Studio ????/???】???? #】dant【eimperiu\mbrut #prenyeparty #welcometom【yworld #industria】】lparty #【gabormszoke #studiolife #sex【 #danteem】pire w】\ith @b\ertaha/uer ❤ʊ【39; 】phot/o by @gregusmateA pos/t 】/shared by 】Gabor Miklos Szoke, Arti\st (@gaborm】/szoke/) on Jan 5, 2018 】at 2\:05pm PST/When did your interest 【\/in art and sculp/ture begin?"I’ve been 【i【nvolved in crafts\ since child【hood. I a【lways drew /a l】ot and made little sculp/tu/res】. Twelve /years ag【o, I w\as a/t an art 【retr】eat wi】th\ my】\ univer】sity class\ma\tes and it \was there that I fi\rst/】 gathered w\ood planks/ and stic【ks\, a/nd rea\/liz\ed/ that it could 【actually be a pretty cool\ mean of artistic expression. It&rsq/uo;s almos】t like drawing thin【gs in spac/e【 whilst【 enablin】g you to 【mak【e massive art pieces. I quickly realized/ that this would b/e something big beca】u/se on the way back fro/m the art retreat I put the makeshift sc\ulp\ture\ 】【on top o】\f m【y car and【 /ever/yone was taking photos as I was driving【 away. So I decided to 】pursue t\his \style to make a bigger impression with my sculptu/res. It’s also a way of keeping things fr】o【m th/e past/ an\d /givin\g the【】\m a new exist\ence."What are the sustain\able methods /】a】nd p【ractices yo】u empl【oy\ in 【your a】rt?"My w\hole ar【tistic motto is /giv】ing old things new meanings, kind of 】lik】/e w【ith my stu\dio. Back in its glory days, the Manfr&e\acut】e;d Weiss Steel \and Metal Works he】re in Cse【pel【 was t【he second biggest in Europe. I’m r/eally inspired by old thin\gs because d【espit/e their age/, they tend 【to be】 mu\ch s【turdier【 than】 new ones.""Whe/neve\r I ca】n, I\ create my art from reused materials, tar\ a【nd found objects. Ten years ago around Chri\s【tmas time 】I】 was lef\t with a \lot 】of wood 】that I wou\ldn’t/ n\eed【 in the coming ye】ar. S】】o, in/stead\ of throwing it 【al/l out, I made l/ittle Christmas tree sculpt【ures and sold【 them. Since then, it /has become a/ 】traditi】on and I always do this around Christmas 】ti\】me】. 【On】 the o【n/e h/and, /nothing gets thrown away \and on the other it saves thousands of 【pine t\rees bec/ause 【people\ who【 buy my “trees” won’t be buy/ing real one】s for ma】ny years to come." View 【/this p\ost on InstagramChristmas gift 【alert/: My new X【mas】/ trees are out, save a tree and buy some/ a【rt☝️more/ i\nfo】r\mation/ 【on the /web】site, \click \on BIO;\)/??A post s/hared by Gabor Miklos Szoke, Arti/st (【@gabormszoke)\ on Nov 16, 201】8 at 【7:25am P】ST"Enviro\nmental a】wareness in ge/neral is 【something\ that/【 is very 】important for Berta an】d m【【/yself. B】ack in 20/10, righ【t /a\fter fi\nishing my s【tudie/s, I represented Hungary at a/n/ 】international art\ comp】etition o\rganized by th\e【 Collegiu】m Hungaricum Vienna. The th\eme was the Dan】ube Ri/ver. Unfortunately, &ld】quo;civilization” ha\s dec/imated the once v/ibra\nt river an\d turne\d it i】nto an oily, contaminate【d smu/dg/e. In \the Danube River, the sturg】eon is on the brink of extinction. Th】ese f/i【sh are e【xtremely sensit/ive to】 environmental p【re】ssures, making the\m/ valuable indicators for healt【hy【 rivers. To\ emphasize how dire the situation \is, I ga【\thered pla\stics and debris f【rom the Dan【ube to create "The Last Stu/rgeon" piece. These m/at【eria【ls, the manner of\ formulation, the fish&r【】s【quo;s f【ractured ski/n – all this re/fers to】 its unnatural 】way of perishing an/d \calls 【on the viewer to take greater responsib/ilit【y/ for our h】【itherto ne\gligent attitudes towards the species t【hat sh【are t【his planet 】with us【.""T\he Last /St】urgeon" sculpture in【 ViennaSoc\ial \responsibility\ in general is of great importance to 【you. What ar】e some of the\ most press\ing cause/s fo】r you c】urrently? How do you address them in your a】rt and what else are you【 doing 【to fight for th\】em?"In 2014, 】I wa/s// as/ked to create a symbol for t】he Tollwood F】esti\val in Munich/. This festival is k】n】own fo】r its stance \on envi\ronmental and /ani/mal 】welfare issues. T\hat year the f【\ocus was】 on the \ter】rible conditions endured by fa/rm animals 】so I create】d the “【Sad P【ig”, a gi/ant p【i【g statue t】hat i】s】 far too】 big for the nar/row ste\el cage it is forced to live in. A】【t that ti/me, Munich【 had/ the/ hi【】ghest pork consump\tion in\ all of/【 Europe/ so I \wa\nte】d to r\aise awareness about the animals’ t/ragic fates.""Sa】d Pig"/ at\ Tollwo】od Festival/"Sa【d Pig\" at Tollwood Festival"Also, I try【 to 【do/ what I ca/n for disadva】nta】ged a\】n\d minority communities /here\ in Hungary.\ In【\ 2012 I】/ took part in【 the c】haritable Hello Wood】 art camp/. I d\ec\id/ed to create a tot\em animal in the /form of a “Guardian Tiger” for one of th/e】 poorest v/illages in/ th【【e country, where m】ost members belong to the Roma /mino\rity. The villa//ge endured many hardships and muc】h violence in the pa】st】 】but with the【/ arrival o【f this/ 【“guardian】”】 came media attention and with】 \t【hat, 】g\overnment funds to raise the\ standard of 【/living in this villa/【ge. Th【e villagers love this tiger, t\ake great care/】 【of it, and 】or】ganiz】e an an【nua/l "Tig\er Festi】val". Seeing all this positive \im\pac\】t was one of 【the/ most touchin【g m/oments for me. By do【ing good, good】 cam/e \back to me a】s well because it was this project /t】hat g/ot【 【me global media \attention.""The Guard】ian Tiger【" sculpture"Af】ter the “Guardian Tiger&r【dquo;, the authorities】 of similarly disadvan】taged/ 】lo】c【ales\ started to g/】et in touch with me to brighten up/ the lives of thei\r citizens 【through art【. In 20【13】,【 I installed a guardi/an unicorn in the f【orest near t】he Russian town】 of Vyksa\,/ known for being the largest manufacturer of steel welde\d pipes and railway wheels 【in Russia. The magical creatu】r【e rem/in\ds pe【opl【e that you can be an individual even in a glum, i\ndustrial town. A \si】milar colourful unicorn was create\d the same year in Kazi【ncbarcika, an i\ndu】strial tow\n in Hungary full of apartments' blocks. Lo/cals really【 l\o\ve this 【】unicorn and pla【nt pretty fl【owers on】 the roun\【dabout on which it&rs】quo;s l/ocate\d. I eve【n think that\ one year it won the country&rsq】uo/;s 'Prettiest Roundab\out' award!/""Rainbow Unico【r\n""\I find i/t ve\ry im\portant to improve the visual 】culture of kids so】 that the coming generations kno】\w/ how 】to app】reciate and preserve beauty】. Th【e Hungar】ian town of Érd commis\sioned /\me to bring【 life to local k\ind\ergarten building/s and I d【ecided to get t【he\ ch】ildren in】volv/ed【 by encouraging them to take part in the brainstorm【/in/g process. I 【as】ked them questions like\ what they dreamt of, what th【eir f/avorite】 animals were, et/c. and together we create\d friend】ly animals all around\ the kindergarte】ns./"The Kinder/gart】e】n Project/Eva Szombat"In general, I beli【eve the sculptures in pub/li【c spaces affect 】p/eople&rsqu【o;s l/【ives no matte/r wher【e they are. And 【】as【 for【 【my wo/r/ks, they a\re a【lways\ exactly】 whe【re \they ne】ed to 【be and t/hey always somehow refle/ct and connect to/ the place they are in."Ho/w, in your opinion, does art he】lp】 raise awareness about impor/ta\n\t\ issues\ like a】nimal welfare an/d climate/ ch】a\nge?"In t【erms /of PR and communications, you can do a lot of messagin】g. 【I/ cre】ated a rhino sculp/】ture 【\for the Budapest Zoo in 2013 and it’s a re【curring th\】eme for me. Every ye】ar\ I p/ost a ph】oto of it an/d rem】ind my\ fol】\low\ers/ that this year there are a lot/ fewe】r of t】hem l/ef【t in the wild than the year b/efore." 【View this post on I\nstagra/mVisitin/g Sanyika【 a【t th【e Bartha Factory ?/?@tomi.bartha #【Sa\nyika #Sa】nyib&aacut】e;csi #rhino #rhino/ceros #wild\life #be/echwood #\【sculpt】ure #bigb/oy #gabormiklosszoke #габ【086; 】88;l【4;&【#【1080;клошсё 】82;еA post shared by Gabor Miklos Szoke,\ Artist (@gabo【rmszoke) on Mar 3, 【2016 at 1:20】pm P\ST\"I try to stick /to the animal t】heme /not \only【 be/cause they&rsqu】o;re a cool s【hape【 but because there’s an【 underlying message/ I /【usually want to get across with eac】h work. Because t【he】y are mostly/ on display in public 【】spaces it helps reac/h al/l ag【e grou】ps and social backgrou/nd【s and \ref】lect on the role an】imals pla/y in our lives."Share this article More\ 【from l/ifeNXrC

1.o3aBIn a move designed to kickstart what CE【O Ma】rio Di Mauro desc】ribes as &ldq\uo;a ne】w digital game&rdquo【;, internatio【nal service prov/ider Sparkle】 laid a sy【mbolic 【fo\undation /stone 】for the comp/any&rs【quo;s lates【t data centre on 21 Ja\nuary\. Situate/d j】ust 】o/utside Athens, \/th/e 【new site will hou】se Sparkle’s fourth d【ata centre i【n Greece, and【 \forms part of a【n /ongoing\ strateg【y 】to invest in t】he country【.Metamorfosis\ II will /incorporate the/ lates【t environme/ntally fr【ie】ndly technology, and wi\ll offer over 6,】/00】0m2 of data co-location space, 】allowing 】for the expansion o【f a client b\ase that cur】rently include】s serv/ice pro/viders, syste【\m in/tegrators, local a【nd i】nt【ernation/al bu/sinesse】/s, content providers, instit/utions and OTT media services.A key play/er in /\the\ global 】telec/oms marketAs the international a】rm of Italian telecommunications giant TIM, 】Sparkl\e has a 】prese【nce in 3 countries, with a proprietar】y \backbone of/ around 53【0,000 ki【\lo】metres of fibre optics【 a/cross four c【o/ntinents. It offers a wi【de range of/ IP, data, cloud/ and 【voi/c/e servic【es to customers, ensur【ing excep】tion\al se/\curit【y 【and relia】bility.The/ f【\ocus 【for it【s data centre/s is Europe, an】d specific/ally the Medit\erranean area. Spar】kle has【 been 】operating in Greece since 2001, and already has one data c/】entre】 in Cre【te and two m】ore just outsid/e【 Athens/.Th/ese have a com\bined space of 8,000m2, but the n/ew【 Meta/【morfosi\s II wil/l add to this capa/cit\y wi【th /clos【e to 6,000m2 】of add\itional /c\o-loca\tion sp\ace. As with the company’s】 existing cen】/tres 】in Greece, Metamo【\rfosis\ 【II will b【e】 fully integrated in Nib\ble, the /new pan-Med/i【terranea【n photonic network, and i】\n Seabone, Sparkle】's IP/MPLS internet back/bon/【e, providing high-performance services and indu】s\try-benchmark s】pe】eds.Environmental su】stainability as stra【tegi/c priorityPlans for /the co/nst】ruction \of the new com/plex put envir【onmental concerns fron【【【【t and centre. &ld/quo;The new /European Com】mission has ma【de sustainability the\ \key iss\ue 】in the fut\ure】 policy of Europe,”【 say】/s Salvatore Rossi, chairman of TIM. &l【d\q\uo;E【very private compan】y acting in 】the m/arket has to understand that this 】is a business opportunity, no\t a cost.\&】rdquo;\Sparkle’s\ commi【tment to environmental sust】\ainability\ is not】hi】n】g new, a【nd\ its business operations】 were the first 】of their kind in Greece /to be awarded with\ the ISO 14001:2015/】 certifi【cation, wh【ich recog\n】ise】s the company’s e】nvironmental-pr】otection/ me\asures.【S】parkl【/e&/rsquo;s Is\tanbul d\a/【ta 】centre is h】eld to be someth/【ing of a blue\print in /the ind】ustry, and a re\cent expansion and renovation 】saw th\e addition 】of state-o】f-t\he-art te【chno/logy【】 【that enabled the company to increase c【ap【acity b】y 40 p】ercent /\while reducing\ consump】tio/n by 14 pe\rcent.A key factor was the introduction of lithium-ion /(Li-ion) batteries, an innovatio】n that will also play a role in th/e Metam\orfo【si\s II /cent/r\e, along with the latest en【ergy-efficien/t light, /】/power and cooli【ng systems. Thes/e will jointly allow a carbon-footprin/t reduction o\f around 28,000 ton】s a year, or【 】/– i/n simpler ter【ms &nd】ash/; 】will require close to half the energy req/uired to run a \regular data centre of comparable size and capaci【t\y.Reco】gnising local potentialBut 】technolog/y is onl【/y half the pi】cture. For five years in【 a row 【Sparkle has won Infocom awards that acknow】ledge the /com【pany&rs/quo;【s success in the cloud and data indus】tries,/ as well as its/ contribution to the d【e/velopm【/ent 】o】\f t】he Greek m】arke】t/ overall.\As t/he green shoots of recovery emerge fro】m Gr\eece&rs【quo;【s lo【ng per\i/od of s/tagnation and aus】】terity, Sparkle se\es boun\dless possibiliti【es in the region. “For us, it&rsquo/;s】 ver/y important to develop our】 activities in the 【centre of the Mediterranean area,” says Alessa【\ndro Pa\】nsa, cha【i【rman of S】parkle. “】We want to extend ou/r activities in Asia,\ i【n Africa, in 【\ot/her parts of】 the wor\ld, but 】Athens\ will be t】he focal point 【for ou【【r next /a】ctivity./【”The ques\t】i【on is not 【merely one o】f】 /e【conomics. Mario 】Di Mauro is ke/en 【to leverage the vast pot/\ential he se\/es in the country/’s human capital. &ldq】uo;We have \here/ p\eople\ who are cap\】abl\e of pla/ying this inn】o】vation 【role, and these people a【re /impo【\【rt【ant.&r\dquo;Laying】 o\ut his】 】vis【ion f】or the future, Di】 Mauro predicts that th】【is i】nvestment \in Greece and its workforce will not only b】en【】efit the company’s operatio/ns wit/hin the country, but t/hat he hopes to “\】【c】】apit/al/i【se on al】l this k】nowledge /for all 】the global operation【s of Sparkle.”Share this】 articleCopy/past/e the article video embed link \be【low:CopyShar/eTweetSharesendShareTweetSharesendMoreH\ideShareSendShareShareShar】eSendShareShareMo\【re abo/utTelecommun【ic【ation\Techno【log【yBig Da\taI【nvestmentEnvironmental protection / \ Browse【 today&【#039【;】s tagsWZ2I

2.mDbqGreen growth: promot/ing i【n【n】ovation and sus/ta\in/ability to foster busines\s in Europe\kH2P

3.sqXDDub】ai acts to ste【m the 】ti【de of single use plastic5Gr2

4.CzHzFive new ways to help the env【ironmentwYbB

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si53The big, bea/【utiful Baltic Sea 【/hides /a dirty secret in its 377,00】0km of water.A\ 【number of agricultural/ spills has turned t】he Baltic【 into one of /t/he most /pol】lu\ted】 seas in】 the wor】ld, due to excess nitrogen \and phos\phorus lacing it】s wat【ers.This process of eutrophication ha\s【 led to \the de\pl/etion \/of oxyg】en and /an【 overg\】rowt【h of algae in the body o【f wa】ter, 【but not 【al\l h】ope/ is 【】lo】st.\Eutrophication ex/p】lai【nedAn unlik】ely assist/an】tMussel farms lik\e【 Kieler Meeresfarm【 in the Germ【an port city of Kie】l are ho/p】ing 【to ma【ke a dif】f【eren】ce in th/e 【Baltic'】s/ increasin\g【ly di【fficult fight\ against algae.Hundreds o【f tho】usands of th\ese mighty mol/lus\cs wo/rk to filter the water eve/ry day by\ eating their way through microsc】opic a\lg】ae.Kieler Meeresfarm 】is just one f】arm taking pa\rt in Balt/ic Blue Growth, an experimental【 Europe/an pro】ject coordinated based in\ Sweden's Ostergötland region.Th【e】 p/roj【ect is worth 4.6 million Euros, with/ 3.6 million 】Euros coming from regional aid under the EU Coh/esion Policy. 18【 partners in six B【altic co【untrie】s are taking p/art.All six participating farms/ are locate】d in importa【nt】 strategic locations across th\/e Baltic region/.The farms are all in close co】n\t【act with \each】 other, sharing techn/iques and /ideas despite having diffe/rent\ experiences.Kieler】 Me】eresfarm f】ounder Tim Sr【a\ufenberge/r \says '】'I'm having【 here diffe【rent【 conditions th【\an in Sweden. So w/ha【t 】works for me doesn't really wo】rk in】 Swed\en and/ vi/ce versa b\ut we 【can talk\ to each other and have that \shari【ng of i/deas.''T【he wate】\r quality and transparency is mea】sured twice a year and researc\h】ers sa】y that the results ar【e conclusive.1212121212121212More than/】 just mu【ssels\NGO Coas\【tal Union Germany, EUCC, is 】als】o helping to raise soci】al awa/ren/ess on imp/ro\ving water qual】ity.EUCC has cre【at【e】d a number of databases and learning tools for intern【a】tional networ】ks, providing\ relevant i】】nform【/at【ion, wo】rkshops /and 】conferenc\es about/ the im/porta/nce /of usin】g】 musse/【ls to impro】v/e wa】te/r qualit/【y i/n \the Baltic Sea.Looking to the futureThe project's ultima】te aim is \to bring r【eal change to the【 Baltic Sea region.This i】\s 【expected to be done in revolutionis/ing\ the us】e o/f /musse/】l meal for ani【mal feed. The【 project is expe【】cted to also at\tract int/erest from broader \markets,/ at/tracting /entrepreneur/s /and in\vestment in mussel m\eal as a viable alternative to curre【nt\ animal feed.Watch s】ome of【 ou【r social media coverageShare this】 ar】t【icleC\opy/】paste the ar\//ticle video em【be\】d link below:Cop】y【\ShareTweetSharesendShareTweetSharese\ndMoreHideShareSendSh】areShareShareS【end/ShareShareYo】u mi/ght also like/ / \ / 【 Devise【 P【roject: Ireland puts the spotli\ght on digital/ SMEs / \ / 【 More aboutContamination of waterEn【vironmental 】protecti】/\onF/aun】a and F【loraGermany Browse today'\;s tagsQXsi

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5De2It 】is one of the most popula/r destinations for /tourists and one of the most famous islands in the world but its 70,In Pic】tu【res:】 Deforestation in Brazil's rainforest\【 】【is close to five time/s the size of Lon\don\0 inhabit\ants l】ive under the real threat of a pos/sible earthquake or a vol】canic eruption &md【ash; with【 no \evacuation plan【 set up.Ischia 】is on\【e of the pearls of the N\e【apolitan archipelag】o.\ Lar\ger th】【an Capri】 a/n\d Pr】ocida, 】its tourism has d【eveloped thanks to its morphological peculiarities and its volc\anic o/rigin【s. Even\ i】n winte\【r, the /elderly【 savour thermal treatments while younger and 】adventurous visitors take delight in climbing Mount Epome\o — Is【chia's peak that/ rises on /the【 slopes of 】an a【ctive s\ubmarin\e volcano whose last eruptio【【n da】\tes back to 1302.Walking aroun【d the si【x towns scattered a【roun【d the /islan/d, it \is impossible 【\not t/o no\tice// the sma\ll clouds of white smoke rising from t/he/ ground, emanating fro【m fumaroles o/r cracks in the earth th】at emi【【\ts off st】eam】 a\nd gas."Ischia is a volcanic island/, /the po】rt itself is o/n an ancient crater" explains Francesca Bianco】, director of the Nap】les Sectio【n of 【t】】he National Institute of Geophysics \and Volcano【logy's】 Vesuvius 【Observatory. The INGV【 moni【/tors vari\a】tio】ns in the param/eters \of control in the Neapolit】an volcanic distric\t, /an area that includes V/esuvius, Ischia and the Phlegraean 】Fields."At the m【oment \we are not 【recording an active volcanic dy【namic for \Ischia —\ I mea】n 【that the volcano is activ】e \but there are /no ano【malies. Instead,/ we are wit\ne\ssing a phase of lifting \an\d we\ have raised the alert l【evel【 for the Campi Flegrei," she\ added.'We live on fire'The underwater vol【can】o /is t】herefore 【no\t the imme\diate concern of researchers but I】sch【ia mu/st still face the threats of seismic mov】ements indirectly linked /【to its presence.I【n August 2017, the island was【 hit /b】y /【an /earthquake t【h【【at killed two people, injured more than 40 others, and destroyed man【y hous】es."We cannot】 predict earthquakes but \w】e know the seismi【c his】to/ry【 of the i\sland," Bianco continued. "The 2017 event i】s not\ linked to m【agm\/a【tic phenomena but we kno/w that, due】 to the presenc\e of the volcano, a】/nd its w/eigh\t, the isl】and is low\e/r【ing causing fr/act\ures. It is obviou/s that v】olcanic dynamics increase the seismic risk 】of【 Isc/】hia."The earthquake al/so highlighted just how difficult it can be to ma\na/ge an emerg\ency on the island. That ni\ght ab】out 20,000 people 【&mda/sh; l/ocals a【nd tourist【s &mdas\h; came to the\ port 【to be ev】a】cuat【ed but there we【re not enough ferries.Neverthe【less, th\e Ischitans do no【t seem to \worry t【oo m\uc\h a】【nd\ f】ace the/ risk 】with a t/ouch of typic\ally Ne【apol】ita\】n fatalism."We literally l/i/ve on f】ire, we p【ut ourselves in the hands of the Eternal Father, what/ 【else shoul【d we do?" an elderly gentleman, wh】o /sells cheeses and mozzarella on the roadside/, s/aid."You see,【 we 】are surrounded by the 【sea, 【where shoul】d we go? If there is an】】 eruption we die on t\he island or at sea, it\ is impo】ssib】le to 】leave he\re qui\ck/ly," a【nother inha【bitant said.'No integrated plan/'Fabio Matter\a, from the local Ci/vil \Pr\ote【ction, told Euro【news \that "there is no i\ntegrated plan【 on the is//land】 fo/r erup\t/ions and【 earthquak\es," despite【 the fact /that "th/e 2017 /】shoc/k ca【u\ght】 us comp\letely un【prep\are/d【.\""There is no in】/tegrated plan of the islan】d for】 eruptio】ns and earthquakes. 【The shock of 201】7 has caught us 】completely unprepared," explains 【Fabio Mat\ter【a of t】he local Civ】il Protection, while 】he\ sh【】ow\s me the small opera/ting r\oo【m 】o/bta【ined in an a/ncient therma/l centre used for ot【her functions/."Th/e Campania】 region has recently【 issued a tender for the municipalities to finance 】evacuation plans. Now 】every singl\/【e【 muni/】c【ipality should work out its /own plan,"\ he】 sa\】id, labelling it "nonsense""If t】he/re is 【a disaster i】t will involve the 【whole island and/ the/ strategy 【shou【ld be common," he concluded.Fran\cesco Emilio Borreli】, regional councillor for the/ Green party has 【been critica\l of the lack o】】f pre\paredness for years."】The 【three a\reas obs【erv】ed by【 the /INGV 】a】r\e【 very urbanised,"\ h】e flagged. "Vesuvius inv/olv【es】 700,000 people, there i】s\ an evacuation plan but the exercis】es】 are no】 longer carried【【 \out.】""In Pozzu/ol】】i (Campi Fle/gr/ei) they have created an ev】acuation plan and h\a/ve begun to 】do/ some test【s but we ar【e v】ery f【ar from the possib【ility of actuall\y saving 500,000 people. In/ Ischia/ there app】e/ars to be 】little interest from anyon【e,/ perhaps t/hey think\ tha\t\ it is impos/sible to save i/ts【】 inhabitants,/" /he went 】on.Men \vs naturePhe【nomena such as 【/ear/thquakes and volc/a【/nic eru/p】tions are often 【\unpredictable and dep\e】/nd on nature but some \of the serious consequenc\e】\s of the earth/quake \of 2017 can be attributed exclusiv\ely to human action.T【he volc/an【i\c areas/ of the Neapo【lit】an territory have face】d w/\ild urbanisatio】n over th/e years with administra/tio\ns that rarely managed to opp\ose buildi/ng sp\eculation.Vesuvius, Campi F/leg\r】ei and 】Ischi\a are home to over 1%】 of the Ital/ian\ popula【tion, exposed\ 】【to pos\sibl】e cat/astrophic ev\e/nts \without the p\ossibility of ra【pid eva】cuation.A well-known risk that did no/t prevent the pop】\ula】ti【on of Is/chia from 【growing ex/ponentially from 23,511 inhabita【nts in\ /1861 /t/o 34,201 in 196/1, and 64,031 in 2016.Over the /l】ast 】50 years】, urbanised areas on/ the】】 island ha】ve g/rown from 9% of the 【/whole/ territory \to 30%, a figure thr【ee times highe\r \than the nation【al average,\ accordi【ng t/o researc/h【ers from the U【niversity of L'Aqui\la.\/【 Ev【en \tourism【, after a brief decline following the e\arthquake, is g【rowin/【g ag【ain, with over 3 mill】ion ann\u/al visitor】s."There【 are\ d\oze\ns of magnit【ud\e 4 earthquakes i】n Italy. The one in Ischia o】f 2017 is the onl/y one /I ca\n \remember havi【ng caused s】im【ilar damages\ \",【 Bianco explained. "The damag【e of this pheno【menon, in th】is\ 【case/, is to be attributed 】more to \h/o/w men\【 have decided to/ build than 【to nature,"【 she con【cluded.'Single\ muni】cipality'For\ Bo/relli, the situation is】 【"rea/lly deadly"."We have a simila】r situation to】 Japan, we are talking about 【the are】a】 with the/ highest number of volcanoe/s in 】Italy and at the same time\ the mos】/t\ densely populated and highly 【urbanised, with th\e gr】eatest\ anthro【pic pressure and the highest /rate】 】of illegal activity," he stressed."The absen】ce of an evacu//a【tion pl\an for Ischia】 is explained by an irresponsibl/e policy. N【【ature is cyc\lic/\al, we\ know that we will f【ace other】 earthquakes, perhaps \an e/ruption, it may be/ in a ce\ntury, in a millennium. W\e should have a pol】i/cy that loo/ks to t\omorrow but it would be necessary 】】to pu【t admini【strations and citize】ns in f/ront of t/he fact that some areas must be co\mpletely evacuate【【d," he continued.【A fisherman told【 Euronew】s on the s\hore of t/he p】o\rt tha】t a/ single【 admin/is/tration should be c/reated to come u【p wi/th a single evac】】uatio/n 【plan /】for t】he whole island a/nd t\h】at the mayors o\f/ th【e six municipalities should, th】erefore, wo\rk together."I think that i\f they do\n't do it, n【ature will/ do what we can【't do: Epomeo will explod】e, ma/ke six lavas【 of fire and fi\nally】 make a single municipality," he said【.Share 】t\his articleS【hare\T/weet\Sha】re/send】Sha\re/Tweet\SharesendMoreHideShareSend/ShareSha【reShare/\SendS【har】eShareYou migh】【t also li】ke 】 \ 【 】 /Ita】lian【 brid/】ge【 colla】ps\es injuring only/ 】one\ as lockdown condit\ions red//uce traff】【ic 】 】 【 Ita/lian d【o/ctor treats/ corona】virus patients【】 at h【o/me 【 】 【 / / 【 【 】/ Baskets of【/ s\oli\da/r【ity lowered/ from Na\ples balconie\s amid】 coro/na\viru/s chaos 】 】】 \Mo【r【】【e aboutVolcano eruptionItalyEnvironmental prote\ctionEm/er//gency / 【Brow【se to】day s\ tags2jpo

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iXvtA】ngela Me【rk\el wants\】 Germany to aim to \n\eutrali/se gas e【missions by 20502u7B

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zzatFor 50 yea\r】s an Israeli【 o【il comp【【any has 】kept bathers 【off a Red Sea bea/ch near】 t/he resort of Eilat bu】t \it co【/uldn’t 】stop sea life from flouri\shing.I【n a wor\ld where co】【r】al r】eefs are s】hrink\ing rapidly, the one \in Eila\t has grown.Due/ to /a lack of human interf】e【rence,】 a spectacular /coral reef blo/】sso】med o】v【er time attracting exotic /fi】sh \and/【 dolphins to th/is 【aquatic paradi\se.The 300-me\tre-long be】ach was handed back to the publi\c a year an/d a half ago after the】 Eilat Ashkelon P【ipeline 】Company (EAPC) 【scaled back it\s operat】io【ns.Now, with access lift【【e/d, int】erest is /mounting 【f\rom scuba divers \an\d tourist】s/ alike w/ho want【 to vi】sit.In response, Israel's Na/ture and Par/ks Authority decided to relocate the cora\ls for their own pr/otecti】on so \the /ind】ustri/al de/bris left /】】by E【APC\ could be removed.S【hare this articleCopy/paste】 t【he article 【video embe】/d link below:CopyShareTweetSharesendS】hareTw】eetSharesendMoreHideShareSendSh【areShare\ShareSendSh/areShareY/ou\ might also 【like 】 '\;Israel is no l/onger a democracy�】9;: Netan\yahu accused of exp【loi】ting coron/avirus to sa/ve career 【 / 】 \】 / / Israel e\】lection: Exit p/olls give Netanyah】u nar\r/ow/ lead / 【 \ \ 】 】 】 / 】 \ \/ / 】 】 Palestinian P\resident Ab】bas cu】ts ties with Israel a】nd US 】over peace plan / More aboutCora/lsIsrael\Envir【onmentEnvironmental protectio【noil 【industry】Touri\sm Browse today's tag】sxOYp

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CLUCText sizeAaAa“Every】 time I \have a bath, st】ill now, I say 【than/k you. I sti【ll feel the gratit/ude. Every morning when I wake up and can make/ a cup of tea without building a fi/re, I think ‘god that’s so amazing I ca\n do that.’”I was t\hrille/d when Alex Fisher agreed to meet 【me, k【een to tell a s【tory that has been \【【overloo】ked in the last 25 years - forgotten as a new wave of climate ac【tion sets in. Alex was an env【【iron\m】enta【【l campaig/\ner for se】veral ye\ars in t】he 1990s,\ st\and\ing up for th】e tr【ees w】hen【 go【\vernment scheme/s 】thre\a【tened to\ cut /them down\. For a whole yea【r, she liv/ed outside i】n t【he /fo】rest, often/ /h】igh up in treeh/ouses or &lsq/uo;twiglo\o/s’, abse【iling d】own tree trunks in th【e morning for b】reakfast.\ Magical as it may sou】nd, the realit/y was far from the【 Enchante】d Wood in the 】Enid Blyton se\ries, a/ childho/\】od fav【o【urite of /my intervi【ewee. \For c】ampai【gners like Alex,【 it was a v【eheme【nt form of activism ag\ainst politically mo\tivated deforestation, enforced by【 /law in a bid to build mo/re\ /road【s.&l【dq/uo;&po/und;20 b\illion w【\as the budget&r【dq/\uo;/, s【he recalls. &ldq/uo;They called it the bigg\est road building s/cheme since the Romans.”\/ 【\For the 【activists, the p】roble/m wasn&rsq【/uo;t only the size of the project, but/ the places they had \chosen to bui\ld 】/th【e ro/ads. Alex/ speaks n】ostalgically \of whole /landsca】pes that were destro【yed, 500-year-】old trees】, bluebell forests, wat【/e【rfalls a【nd SS】SIs【 (specia/l si】tes of sc/i【【entific /interest) which served【 】as vital animal habi】tats. “An/ oak tre】e suppo】r/ts hundre】ds of different /species”, she te】lls me\, adding/, “】w/hen you cu\t one【 down, that’【s 500 years】 of gr【owth undone /then a】nd/ 【there.】 I】 pl】anted 10 sapli】ngs from an/ o\ak tree 25 years ago, but \they are/n’t eve\n \/old enough yet /to make a【co【rns &nda\sh; it/ takes【 】30 years.&rdq/uo;Alex's ne/wspape\r clippings from her scrapbook, char\ting 【he/r time at the road protests c】amps\Euronews LivingFrom fashion t】o the f/or\e】stFor\ \Alex, a d/】eep love and r】esp【ect f\//or nature de】veloped\ e】arl【\y on. 【G【r/owi\/ng up on the /outskirts of Brighton, she spent mos】t of her childh\ood cycling in th】e countrysi【\de and 】playin/g in her very own】 treehous】e at the end /of \the garden. As【 a young ad/ult, she moved to Lo/n/don in s/earch \of a career in fashion jo/urnalism, swap】pi】ng her/ rural roo/ts for t/he bright lights of the city.Sh\e ended up 【working 【at Vogue and, wh【】ile \her time th【ere was “unb/elievabl】y excitin【g”, sh】e soon realised that the fashion industry simply existe】d/ to\ \pr】omote what she calls &ldq【【uo;obsolete consumeri/sm.”\ “It wasn’t abou】t// caring”, she /tells m【e, “they may have seasons in 【fashion - //bu】t they take tha】t from n/ature.” What’s in for Au】tumn is out by Sp】ri/ng,【 encouraging a constant loop o\f disposal materi/alism t/hat is pol】luting the earth.&ldqu\o;I【 took som\/e t\ime out after starting my c\are\er t\o 】think about what I car/ed about m/ost.【 We were on course to destruct the planet and when I hear/d about the road p【rotest movement,/ I kne/w\ I\ had to go and take part/ &nd【ash; it wasn&rsq/uo;t /enough【 ju/st t【o talk about it. I needed to act, and I was willing to risk my life in the process.”Ale】\x\ Fish\e【rEu】ronews Living/Leaving London with a friend,】 Alex/ se】t up camp for the yea\r at the Fair】mi【le prot【est s/ite in Devon\. She \speaks fondly of\ how quickly she/ adap\ted to living /outsid】e. &l\dqu/】o;I \r】em\e/mber w\aking up in the morning, making the fir】e】 】and get everyon\e \&ls【quo;breakfast\ed’.&r/\dquo; She【 des】cribes the resourceful ways they\ woul/d\ have\ to【 adapt to w/eather【\ conditio\ns like snow. What】 daily li\fe wa\s like living outside“\Often the】 water butt w【oul】d h\ave frozen overnight a\nd I w\ould literally have to 】gat\her up the snow and melt it to try and m/a\ke people a cup of t】ea.” E【【veryday tas【ks involved cooking communa【l fo/od, “which was always vegan, because tha】t covers everyone”,/ choppi【ng /wood f/or t\he communal fire pit and carrying\ water.&ldquo】;We al/l lived in d/ome-sh/aped b【enders in【 the tree【s,【 made from】 will】ow poles. 【You connecte【d the branches to a platf\o/】rm underneath, and cov【ered it wit】/h waterproof tarp\aulins and blankets from】 the\ recycling centre.” Curious, I ask how 】they【 managed to stay wa【rm, especially【 at ni【ght d/uring the/ win\t/【er months. “Pretty much everyone/ wore ski/】 salopett】es】 th/ey picked up 【from s\ec】ond-】hand shops 】and got used to 【wear】in【g】. And /of course we m/ade wo/od stoves in every bender to huddle/ round - I remembe】【r sitting there in/ just a t-shirt in】 】Dec\ember in【side a treehouse!”T\he 【ha】rsh 【realityBu【t it wasn’t always so tw】ee. The politic【al nat】ure of\ the movement mea】nt that brutal e\victions were the norm w/h【en camping out in certain/ a\reas. 】With t/he same ra【ge she must have felt at the t/ime,\ Alex paints me a p】icture \【o【f\】 the hundreds of security gu【ards, police】 and bailiffs o】n the scene - hir】e】d to 】extract【】【 the ca/mpaigners fro】m t】he trees. &】ld/q\uo;Ther\e w【ere thr】eats o/f sex【ual violence by【 the ma】le/ sec】ur】i\ty, we were fire bombed, it wa\s extremely dangerous”, she re/collects.&ld】quo;】The security guards se\em\ed【 complet【ely unregu【lat\ed. T/【hey were employed by the road \building con\【tr\actors to cu【t us out of trees using【 big cranes called cherry-pickers. At】 one evictio/【n, I was 【str】appe\d to a tree with a 【harness on, when a pr】ofessional climber cut my s\afety line and came a】/n】d grabbed me. I was scared for my life.”\ Photos of the evi【ctions from 】A【le/【x's scr/apbookEuronews LivingThat t】ime she was arreste【d, /she a/dmits. Taken to the police s/ta/tion with purple/ bruises /up h】/er arm from the quick cuffs, she w【as /【photogra】phed and fi\ngerprinted befo\re being let go with a warning. In many ways, Ale/x rec【all】s she was one of the l【ucky \ones. “I \remem/be/r one person fell 】out of a tree a【/n】d ended up i【n a wheelchai\r.&rdquo/; She de/】sc【ribes the end/uring t\rauma from that period in /t/he】ir live【s, t【he so【un\d of chainsa【ws haunting them for years after the\ \pro\test e【nded. The frustration an\d anger behind \it a\ll, the shee/r horror of decimating the landscape kept 】the campaigner】s 】going every day, Alex exp【l/】【ains. &】l【dquo;Bu/ilding mor【e roads seemed a strang【e policy to adopt when the en\vironmental issues were s/\o well known&rdquo】;, she says. &/ldquo;They should have been 【【investing in the railways and in c/yclin\g rout【es./ T【here seemed complete disregard for any】where th\at was environmentally\ protected【.&r\dquo;The magic of th/e tre\esNonethele【s】s, a【 profou【nd sense of 【community\ and joy appeared to enc【o】/mpa】ss the 】m\ovement】 wherever 【sh\e went. “There was so muc\h\ beauty a/nd joy, it was the s】ubtle th【【ings”, Alex la/ments. //“W/【hen you are in the forest twenty-f】/our hours a day, there【 are cert】ain \things you can’【t experience anywhe】/re else. Like how the l】ight 】changes at 6 o【’clo/ck i\n the 】/morning,【 【th】e sou】n\ds of 【t/he rain on the tarpaul\in,\】 an【d wak/ing up to t/he da\wn c【horu\s.&rdquo】/;Sp】en/ding /much of /her ti/me swimmin/g and washing \in the rivers, she r【e/members that magical feelin】g wh【en, “a/ll of a /sudden, a flock o/f swans w】/o/uld just/ glide past/ 】you.” 】T【hose e【xperiences stay with h】/er t【oday as “beautiful moments where you\ just f】elt it 【was 】such a gif/t to/ be alive.”Photos of the \trees fr\o/m Alex'\s scrapbookEuronews Livin】gSpeaking】 to this \brave, humb】le woman, who ha】s never expected any recog】nition for the f/ight she foug【ht in defence of our trees, I get the 】impress\/ion that i\t wa【s an immense//ly positive time in her lif/e. Yes, th【\e brutality o【f 【the evi】ctions was traumatic, but the 【sense of\ sol【idarity p/erv】ading the movement /see【m/ed more powerf【】ul【\. The simp【l/e pleasur\es of/ cooking aro】un/d a fire every night /and the variety of roles th】e com/munity/ would play 】i】n /sustaining the camps. 】I ask h】er \wha/t she means by /this, a【nd she explains h\ow yo】u di】【dn’t ha】ve 】to be/ living outsid【e to /be part o】f the m【o】vemen】t.&ldquo】;At one of the most 【high-profile ca\mps in】 Ne/w【bur【y, e】veryda/y\ peop/le wo【uld/ come o/ut of t【heir hous【es and sa/y - 【who wan【ts a bath? Y\ou would see 70 campaigner【s graciously accep\ting, queuing up【 ou【tsid】e someone&rs】quo;s house【 to /ha/v【e a bath.【”】/ It was /the gener【osity of /the/ community /that allowed them to c\ontinue/, Alex says, and food【 /and 【clothing dona【tions from individuals /that qui】te 】litera\ll】y sustained t】he camps for a number of yea\rs.How does climate action compare today?In the en/d【,/ the road protest move/ment didn’t st\op the\ whole network from being /built, but nume】rous roads and bypasses were cance【lled at the end of 1996. Ac\t\ivists d/id man/age to save a】 l】o/t of 【landscape, \which “fee【ls like a succes/s&rdq】u】o;】【, Alex/ recalls\ /with a sad smile. “【We increa\sed awareness. At l】east 【politi\cians give lip s\ervice/ to\ envir【onmental issu\es n】owa】d/ays. They \didn’t even spea\k a\b【out it back\ t【he【n, and 】I’d like to【 think】 we had someth】ing to do with that shi\ft i/n cons\cious【ness.&r/d】quo;A shot of】 】the treehouse f】rom the/ ground at【 the protes\t campEuronews LivingWhen I \bring h【er b/ack to 】the present mom/ent and ask what she thinks【 abo/ut 【t】【he cl】imate moveme】nt t】oday, she seem【s frustrated. &ldq/uo;It&】/rsquo;s sad because everything has got so/ mu】ch worse than it\ wa【s 25 years ago, t【he gla】ciers ar】e melt【ing faster\ than ever, we’ve al/ready lost so mu】】ch 】w\ildlife.”I c\an sense】 the\ act\ivist is still alive and we/】ll in/ Alex, despite her more conventional li/festyle nowaday】/s, as an/ editor of a magazin【e】, /liv【in\g in \a house i】n Sussex with 】her son. \But all hope\ is not l】ost. &l】dquo;Greta Thunberg ha【s been /】/an amazi【ng ca/taly/st for 【the yo/ung【e】r generation”, she says. “The situa】t】【ion\ may be/ worse】 but the awarenes】s has broaden【ed. Ext/inction R\ebe】llion ha/ve mobili/sed so many people &ndash】; back then\ we wer/e called ‘crusties’, treated as ma\d\】 members\ of/ society 】an【d ost】racised.”While those o【ver the a\ge of forty wi/\ll likely remember the】】 efforts of the ro\ad p【rotest m【ovement in 90s Britain, millennials are none the wiser. I am grateful 】to have【 met Alex and to share her 【story, as grassroots climate 】act/ivism【 takes hold /of society once】 again in 2019. A 】&】】ldquo;second wav【\e”, A】lex sugges】ts. Ha\vi\ng learnt how to be s/elf\-suffici【en\t, \she&r/squo;ll never take 【for gran\ted the re\sources /that nature can provide a【nd /often longs for the days w\h【en she relied】 on the si\mple warmth of an open fire.【Share t】his article 】 / More from placesDYih

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Z80tNur/s/e/ry school children in the U】nited Ara【/b \Emirates are】 learning e【arly】 about 【the 【importanc\e of recycling leftove】r food\.Li】tt【le 】ones at the Kids Worl\【d \Nursery in 】Dubai】 are ge】tti【ng their h\ands di/rty【 an/d fee/ling the【 diff【erence 】bet】ween green waste, like apples and 【onions, and brown waste which inclu【des leaves and twi【gs.UAE children learn about com【postingAfter 45 days, using worms to create comp\ost fro【m food wa/s】te, the children】 use the enri\che【d mat】er\i】al t】o n】ourish pl/ants in \the nursery’s garden. Once fertilized, the cycl\e starts again.Thr【ee-and-a-half-y/ear\-old \Ja【x V】/an Dyk used the compost 【he an【d his /\class】m【ates m/a】de to feed h/is chili pepper pla/nt. Duri】ng the process, he le【arned an import】ant lesson.“Comp/\ost makes soil and soil make【s p】lants g\row,&\rdquo; he proudly states.Through hands-on learning, 【/nursery】 】children can establish sustainabl\e, lifelong habits, says the nursery’s fou\nder, Lovita/ Ta\riq.An【 impor【tant /question fo/r the kids is【, ‘Why do we recycle?’&\ldquo;We tell th\em wh】at wil/l happen if we don&rs【quo;t d\o these thin\g【s, whilst showi\ng the】m small videos on what’s goi】ng t】o happen i【f the/ world becomes hotter - ho\w t\h/e a】nimals are goi【ng 【to have probl】ems,” she explains.UAE children learn about compostingTHE \AI ANSWER/ 【TO 【F\OOD WASTEFood【 waste costs t】he UAE a【n estimated 3.5 billio】n dollars (3.1\ billion Euros) per year a/cc【or/ding to the Ministry /of /Climate Change and Environment.By 2030\, the coun/\try is pledging to slash food wa】ste in half. A【 national】 】milestone\ ca/me in 28【, when the UAE was able to conserve/ the equiv】alent】 of more than one 】million meals.Pa\rt of it/】s /action plan to tackle the food waste issue 】is【】 t【o look to technology companies for innovative answ】er\s.For\ /example, in //【a bid t【o help global F\&【B bu】sine/sses, London-based】】 start-up Winnow Solutions】 /【is\【 /using a/rtific【ia\l int【elligence to scan and identify /excess wast/e with 】cameras.A/n A】I solution to food wast【e, scans and identifies /e】x【ces/【s waste wi/th camerasThis can, they say, /preven/t/ up to 70 perce/nt of foo】d waste in the firs【t】 year 】of【 】use.Key con【tributors to the Middle】 East【【 regio\n【&rsq【uo;s food \waste prob/l】em are large】 /buffet-style dining】 operations and a culture of gener\ous hospitality,【 say/s Ignacio /Ram】irez, the company’s MENA\/ director.【&ldquo/;In this】 region, cult\urally speaking, 】people \wan【/t th\eir guest to always\ h】ave /eno】ugh【, but it do】esn’t m\ean the\y want to produc\e too much,” h【e expla】ins, adding t【ha\t most food】 wast/ed\】 gl/obally is throw/n \out before 【it reaches people&【rsquo;s p\lates/.Ignaci】o Ramir/ez speaks t/\o Euronews’ \Sali/m/ EssaidWA【】S】TE, LANDFILLS & GLOBA\L \WARMINGMo\re \than one-third of the 【world’s food,/ a/mounting to ar【ound a bill【ion tons, ha】s been wasted yearl】y since 2011, accor【ding to t/he U\nited N/at\ions.In 【landfills/, w【a/ste\d food pro/du/ces nearly 10 p/ercent【】 of the world&rs【quo;s greenhous\e gasses, /affecting glo\bal warming.Exce/ss fo/od waste prod【uc\es【 10 \percent of【 the w\or/ld&】r【squo;s greenhouse gasses\The World Wildlife Fu/nd attributes food w】aste as the】 main 【【cause of deforestation an【d【 the l\oss of w【ater s/】ources worldwide due】 t/o rising food dema\nd/ a】nd consumption, 【and also the conve/rs【ion of forests t\o farmland and ranch land.Gulf Arab co【/untries ha\ve some o】【f the l【argest amounts o【f food wa【/ste, 】ac\co/rd\in】g to the e】/nvironmental service /p\rovider Dubai Carbon.Th\e UAE is \among the top waste generators in th】e w\orld, disposing of an e【stimated 2.7】 kilog】rams of food per person dai\l【y, whi【ch 】is more than d】ouble the rate of Europe, re\ports the agency\.SEEN】 ON 【S】OCIAL MED】IA: 】SUSTA/I\NABLE GROWTHTh/e R\【EEM Pro\gram in Bahr】ain wishes】】 to inspire &l\dquo;little environm】ental【 leaders,” sharing this post of a tree pla【nting /w/ork\shop for ch/i【】ldren. View this post on Instag\r/am#&/#【1576;ر&【#1606;】75;مج_ي&\#15;_/604;&】#/1602;&/#1575;ž/3;ة_】/البيئ&【#77;_】75; 【4;】589;غا】;ر ¡】0;\شاUك في ف/593;&/#1575;&\#1604【;ية【 【#Lيد】10;_【;زUع】; في #ج 】6;】75;【10;】06;_اهم&\#160】4\;\】77; تن&【】#1592;يم【 #جمعي】ة_أصد&#/1602;اء_&/#1575;&/#1】604】;ب【10;/74;ة ب&【#15;ع【575;¡Te/xt si【zeAaAa‘Tis the seas】on to be snowy. Ac【c【ording to\ researc】h by【 Club Med, sustainable, pl\an【t-based 】materials will be the newest trend in\ the\ ski worl/d come 2020.The research emerges as demand for plant-based food i/ncreases year on year, wi\th more c/onsum\ers /choosing ve】getarian and vegan /opti/ons on a weekly basi【s. There has be【en a 39% surge 【in p【lant-based【 eat/ing in Eur/op【e an\d in the】 US,\ /A\m】er】ic】an consumers \purc/has【ed 228 million pla【/nt-【base\d burgers 【between Janu】ary and Ma【y this year.It’s no won】der the【】 ski industry is followi】ng suit, with winter\ hol\iday provider【 Club Me】d stating peop】le want more fro/m their c【lothing and】 an emphasis o【n “ethi】cal ski fa【shio\n.”Accor】ding to \predictions, snow wear will increasingly be made from synthetic a【nd plant-based fa【brics wh】ich are made from soy】beans and/ hemp. /This is/ t\ha\nks to 75% o】f co\nsum【ers wan/ting to m【ake more eco-fri/endly ef【forts to prevent 【c【limate change and more than a third of on\l/ine shoppers \making stricter purchases.Plant-based do【wn/ ski ja】ckets and no\n【-leathe【r boa boots/ are 【f\ore\c/】ast dominate the market/. The jackets will b【e nice and snug\, but cruelty-fr\ee,【 and【 bo/ots wi】ll n\o longer be mad/e using leather. Instead, v\egan alternatives will be on offe/r and 100% GOTS (global o\/\rganic textil】e st/andard) certified organ/ic wool gloves and hats will also be /p\opu\lar.The same study al/so predi\cts tha/t sk\iwear will be revampe】d from a technologica】l perspecti\ve too. We\ will /see the adv/ent【\ of Bluetooth gloves】,/ Ultra HD Smar【【t cameras and ice-repellent snow boots to enhance performance 】in 2020. Overall, skiiers【 are n】ow after better p】erformance, im/proved safety and a sus【tainabilit/y element to \the products 】th/ey are purchasing. Estelle Gi\raudea/u, Manag/ing D/ir】ector UK & 【Northern Europe/ at Club Med said\,&】ldquo;This is /【a/n ex\citi\ng ti\me f/or ski fashi【on. O】【ver the d【\eca///des we have se/e\n clothing】 brands develop exciting new products and wit/h technology advancing】 at suc】h a fast rate, we expect even /more advancements to come.&\rd/quo;T\he【 best eco-friendly skiwear av\ailabl】e no【wEXA Jacket, Pict】u\re Organ【ic Ski\wear, €2【65Picture Organic are a B Corp certified skiwear brand 】with a firm focus on sustainable 】practi】】ce and fabrics. E【ve】ry【 aspect of t【heir /busin【es】s\, from/\ \sou/rce 【m/aterials to \p/ackaging, is tr【anspare/nt and envir\/onmentally-frie/ndly. For ins【tance, they reject the traditional way of /making snow ja【ckets which requi/res pe【trole【um ext\raction. 100% of their prod/uc】ts use【 org/anic, 】rec【ycled an【d bi】o-sourced mater/ials. The EXA jacket is made f【rom 64% r【ecy【cled/】 polyeste】r\ and durable PFC-/free water-repellent treatment, but \does/n't co/mpromi/se on warmth or bre/athabili/ty. These【 de【【sig【ns\ are our f【av】ourite【s. EXA \JacketPi/\cture Organic S】kiwearOpen One 3L Shell Pan\【ts, Openwear, &eu】ro;】329Op\】enwear combi/ne high【 functionality with ethical pr【oduction, /【sus【\tainable\ mat】erials \an】d honesty. Th】e company was f/ounded on the pri【nci】ples of community and t/r【ansparency by Ma【rt\ijn Jeg/erings and /produces stylish, h/ighly f】unctiona【l【 skiwear. Out\erwear is ma/de from eithe\r recy】cled nylon or r】/\ecycled PET bottles】 and \all prod【u】cts bo】ast 20K waterp【roofness. \We love the/se shel/l pants, which come /in four colours.Open One 3L Shell/ PantsOp/enwearMen's\ Pow\der Bo\wl Jacket/,\ Patagonia, €44 (£【;38/0【)Patagonia'\s ski range is world-renow\ned【, offering durable, win\dproof protection and guaranteed warmth. The outdo】or brand has i\mpressi】ve su】stainable】 cred【enti\als, au】diting the/ mater【ials and metho/d/s used,\ taking responsi【【\【bility for the ent/ire life cycle 】of prod\ucts an【d e\xamining h】/ow 【th【ey use resources at our buildings 】an】d facilities.The Pow\d】er 【Bowl Jacke/t is built with /a 100% re\cycled p\ol\【】yeste\】r GORE-TEX face /f【abr【ic a\nd is Fair Trade Certified™ sewn. The questio【n is【, Peppergr【as\s Gre】en or Bal【kan Blue?M】en's 】Powder Bowl JacketPatagoniaS\hare this article\ Mor【e from\】 style\;/77;】】 ا&#【/】16;ا&#/1587;&\#15;ذ/7】; &\#1586;【/610;ن】577; ج\【5;&#/1587;م #&#/1575;ل&】#1593; &#/1608;_ا 】4;&】#1576/;/04;&【#1583; #&#【15【87;اLعة_ا 【4;ش\اي】ة @za】ina_jassim86 و بد/93;\【05;\ م&\#1606; #&【#15【88;】585;كة #\م&【【#1588;اي】593;_ا&#/16】04;م\/605;لك【7】7; با&#/16/04;ت&【#1593;ا&#【【1608; 【/6; م【;ع #أم&#】1606;ا【5;_ا\;لب】;ي/574;】 في #/75;لشما&】#1604;ي\;【77; و #بلدي&/#1577;_【\الش/05;ا/ل&#/1610;ة &/#1588;ك/;【585;/575; ل&】#1605;زارعين الذ¡【0; /Ÿل&#【【0; ا ال/;&#【】571;&#【1591;/ف】575;ل #【575;【604;】زاŸة \&#】160】8;ž【7;ا【&【#1593;د】&\#1607;/&#】1605; في رž【7/; #ش&#【158/0;ž【77;_نوف&\#1605;//76;ر &#【16/08; #نبت/】77;_ 】6;&#】1608\;&/#1】601;مبر من #م/ش【8;】0】4;_غص【;ن/;_ا /4;】6;【81;ي&/#1606; في #كر【انة #ك【585;&/#1575;ن/;ة_ا//60;بحري\ن @bb】n】.b】h &】#1578/;ح&/#1610;ة للم【606;ظم【/;&/#1610;ن ا&\#1604】;】را【/;【74;عين \م】;ن/; #žT/ext siz【eAaAaTakin【g you on a jou【rne】y ac\ross t/he Yorksh/ire Dales an【d all【/ the way\ to Vanco【uver Is【land, Kate Fletcher&/【rsquo;s "Wild Dress" is an autob】iographica】l me】ander through the tende/r mom【ents wher/e clothing ha\s made her f/e【el 【embedde】d in nature. A Professor o【f su】stainability, design and【 fashi】on at the U\niversity of the Arts Lond/】o\/n; Fletch【er【 h\as】 been /a】t t】\he forefront of 【the\ c】/all for s\/ystematic change in /the fas【hion /industr【y.\ In her 【first col】lection of person【al writin】gs, \】Fletcher】 ha/s chosen t/o explore the complex and often art】ificially detached re】la/【t\ionship between the natur【al world a/nd/ what 【we\ wear.Fle/tcher looks at clothing as/ something m\ore e/ssential and far 【beyond its /si】mple【, modern, role as/ a dis】posabl【e commodity. It’s \no【t difficult to see that our c【ultural relationship with clothing has been【 】distorted by years of f/ast-movin【g/ \mo【de】rn /fashio】n t】rends but as she recou】nts the story of her【 【dad&rsquo/;s favourite jumper, there is a glimmer of some nostalgic, int】ergen/er【ational import\ance that breaks through/. Mending this dec【ade/】s-old piece of clothin/g using wool found 】in hedgerows and on fences she mus\es about this as a/ rebellious /act. “As I worked my lap felt w/arm,” she writes【, “Doing this felt like a way to live not】 j/u】st through the rules of 【modern society.&rdqu\o;Ch/arlie M\ee/chamIt’【s not just abo/ut rebell【ing \for the sake of reduci/ng w【ast/e, 】however. Fletcher rec】o【gnizes the】【 way t/hat modern out】do\or clothing i【mpos【es a kind of】 distance from the natural \world.【 The 】clothing we ch\/oose to wear becomes a divisio【n; 】farmworker vs lando【wner, recr\eatio/nal h/iker vs those \who work the land. A ne【ed for\ spe】/ci】fi【c, tec【h】no\log】ically advanced outdoor gear in b\right neon oil-based mat】erials 【is, Fletcher says, ju\st another in/dicat\ion of rampant cons\um\er \cult/ure.Th/e art installati【on teac】hing us to c【are for our/ forestsLivin/g Recomm【ends | A/ "vital tool】"\ for fighting the rising tide of si】ngle/ use plasticsL】\ivin【g Recommends 】| /No/ one is too s】mall to 【make a d【iffer】enceIt’s\ a v【ery d/\】i/fferent way to int【【roduce this/ message. Distan/t from the usual ev/ils of fast fa】sh/ion’s rapidly evolving aesthetics, she e】xp/lores the im\prac/tic/ali【ty of the always new in【 the/ face o/f the a\n】ci\ent /forces of the elements. Fletcher is【n’t preaching about all of the usual】 sust【ainab】le fa】/shion clichés but instead inviting you to think differently about how you\r/ garments can bring y】ou joy. T\he thrill o【f newness is fleeting 【but\ rich cultural relat\】】io】nships can and will【 last 【a lif//e\【time.Jack Gr\angeShunning the newness\ of n\/eoprene allows you to embrace /a\ more per/me\able【 exterior【. &/ldquo】;Once we\/&【rsquo;re there, we learn from the land and listen\ to the voic/es /of the b\irds and the \rain,” she writes, “We /give attentio】n to the unta【med parts of our【 world, in【】clud/ing that 【part in ourselves. [...] And this】 requires,】 at the least, that we make the \la】yers\ that【 \we build up 】ar【ound ourselves&【\mdash; some of wh】ich 】ar】e【 fashio【n in cloth—more permeable.&rdqu】o; Our clothing does\n&rsquo】;t alway】s have to /fo【rm】 a bar】】r【ier \between th】e inside and t】he outside, sometimes, whe】n your /&ldquo\;co】at&\rsquo;s wide sleeves grip\ onto\ t/h/\e lip o】f a gust&rdquo【】;】 o】r/ your &ldq】uo;trousers, wide-】legged act as a kite&rdq】u/o; it can \help you form \a connecti/on 】with na【tu/re.Kate Fletch/【er's Wi】ld Dress: Clothing a\nd the】 natural world is av\ailable from Uniformbooks, more \informatio】n can be fou\nd here.Share this articl/e M/ore 【from\ life;معية/;_/9;دق/;اء_】ا&【#1604;&/#1576;&【】#16】10;ئ/;【77】; #&\#1605;&/#1593;لم&#/1578;نا 】و &\#1605\;دي\رة #【&#【1585;نم&\#1】580;_ري【م #خولة_ا//【604;م】607;نSي &/\#05;س&#】1572;】608;ل /5\;لنظ/610;م 【و&】#1575/; &#/1571【;ن【588;طة &【#1575;لش\;ب】】;Kب\¡/0;【57】7; ال】;【593;Ÿ【0;&【#1608;ة الن】;ط】】77; 【571;. /زي/;ن قاه&】#1585;【610; #【75;ل】57/8;ع&#/04;ي&/#1605;_ا/&#】1604;&#】1576;&【#1610;ي #الت&【#1/593;ل&】#1】610;م_ا\;لب\】610;ئي_ال】قيم/10;【 #】1;م【;ا&【#161/0;&】\#1577;_ا【;لبي】/4; #ا&【#160/4;بيئ&#/1577; #الأ\【;ف&/#1575;ل #\&】#1575;لبي/4;ي\/;ي #/60】2;ا\د】【77; #البي&/#1574【;&/#17; #】75;&【#1604;صغار\; #ب¡Scientists in【 J\or/dan have discov【ered that corals \in the 【Gulf of Aqab【a are\ resisting the rise \in】 water tempe/ratures.Across the\ w/orld/, coral reefs are【 dying at rapid rates due\ to overfis\hing, pol【lution an/d climate ch】ange.It&rsq/uo;s est/i/mated that\ half the of earth\’s r【/eefs have been lost.This figure is thought to be critical, considering that corals are the habita\t of /one in fou【r 【of all marine species.【/Furthermore, up to half of the w/orld&rs【q【u/o;s oxygen co【mes】 fro【m t【\he oceans and the cor\a【l r\eefs wi/【thin.The exact/ reason /for the corals’ resilience in Jordan is s【till unknown, but some analys\t/s b【eli【eve tha\t t/he creatures【 evolved d/ur\ing/ the \last ice age of more tha【n 20,000 years ago.Samp/le/s of c/or/als in Jor/dan used for【 analy/sis】Doctor Fuad Al【\-Horani, professor of coral 【bi】ology and ecology at the //University of\ Jordan, ho\pes that the marine】 inverteb】ra】tes【 【may one-day be the ke】\y to re-pop/ulating th】e world’s\ dyi】ng reefs.“There are tech【niques -/ we can propagate corals," he says. "We can climatise them to c/on/ditions available to them in t【he other 】seas. So, o/nce we grow 】them, w】e can send them abroad where/ they【 ca【n grow them into 】dete【riorated areas or damaged 】r】eef areas./&rd】quo】;Doctor Al Hor/ani wor/ki/ng on c【orals in JordanTOURISM & EC【ONOMIC DEVELOPMENT\ STIL/L J\EOPARDISE AQABA RE【\EFSSpanni】ng【 a distance of 2】7 kilom】etres,/ the s/l/ither】 o\f coastland】 calle】d Aqab/a【 is/ Jordan&/rsq\uo;s only sea-outlet.Despite glimm\ers of hope, the port【\ city&/rsq\uo;s coral remains\ in dange/r, wit】h glo【bal dev【elopment and pollution threatening its surv】ival.Jordan&r】squo;s【 coastland and 】only portTo enc\ourage【 economic】 d【ev/e【lop】ment, whi/lst p\rotecting the re\【efs, i/s therefore a con/【stant c/】hallenge f/or the Jordanian authorities.】Aqaba\ is a major tourism hub which we【lcomed around 100,000 v\isito\rs last year. D/ue to t/he sector&rsqu【o;s expansion, Jordan&rsquo】;/s only 【port 【w】as/ re【locat/ed to】 the si/te 【of one of Aqa/ba&r/squo】】;s lar【gest reefs in 2006/.The governmen【t, w/ith \th/e help of the United Natio/ns, worked to save a portion of t【he t/housand-year-old 【【reef【 by r】/elocatin【g\ t【he coral two miles f】】urther \【alo/ng the coastline】.Co【ral r/eefs in Jo\rdan being r/\eloc/【\atedAccord/ing to Neda/l Al Ouran, He/ad of】 \th/e Environment【, Climat\e Change and Disaster Risk Reduc\tion of th】e United Nations Development/ Programme, /the/ replantation far】ed mu/ch better than \expec【】ted.&】ldquo;We had great】 success,” he says. &ldquo【;Lucki】ly, we got】 a grow】th【 ra/te\ of more \t【han 85 per cen\t,】 w】hich is unique.\ Globally, you would fin\d 【the average growth rat\e af【】ter tra/nspl】antation and translocation would 】be 65\】.”Eco-dive\rs in the region l】ike Abdullah Al Momany, howe/ver【, believe that much more still/ n】】eeds to be done.He is fearful that the relentless rate o】f progress and de】velopme】nt is thre【at【ening to compro】mise the re】al draw of the area/, the re/efs.&ldqu】o/;Here in Aqaba, our \big/gest pr\oblem is us affec/ting【 the marine【 environment as humans,&rd\quo; he says. &ldquo\;I think the government need/s to enforce the law, do more awar【enes\s program【m】【es, and/ do m/ore effort/ in /protect】ing the marine life.&rdqu/o;Share this arti】cleCopy/paste th】e ar/tic【l【】】e video embed lin】k【\ below:CopyShareTweetS【haresendSh/ar【eTwee/tSharesendM【oreHid\eSh/areSendShareSh【\ar【eShareSendShareShareYou m\i/ght【/ also lik】e \ \ 【 /Rain, flood【s and confused se\als: Inside/ An】\tarcti】ca's warmest-ever summ/e】r 】 \ / \ 】 / C】limate migrants: How even\ rich Bavaria ca/nnot provide sh】elter from glo/bal warm】in\g 】 【【 / 】 【 】 Living i【n \a ghos\【t town: Mee/t the Moldovans w/ho refus\e t】o b】e climate m【igra【nts 】 【 M\ore abou】tGlobal warmi/ng and /climate changeEnvironmental pr/otectionEcologySeaJordanHot TopicLearn more about \ Global 【warmin【g an\d climate change Hot TopicLear\n/ mo】r】】e about Global warming and clima【】te change / Browse today's【 tags;&\#13/;ي_【571】;ز\;】585;ع @environmentfriendssociety @efs_bahrain @reem.\efs 】خل【75;ل &#】1605;ر】03;/ اط】601;ا】;【 قادة 【】6;ž】5; 】6;ا【05;&#【1【580; ر】610;م &#/01;ي فعا&#/1【6】04;ية &#/1576;【10;دي ازرع 【ا】04;تي 】8;قا&【#160; كل شهر #ا\;لت/;ع【604;/10;【0】5;_&#】15【75;لب/;يئ #【التع&【#16/04【;&】#1610;م_الب/10;&#】15/74;ي/【;_&\#1575;&/#1604;قيم【/;&#/1610; #&】#\】1581;ما&#【1【6/10】;】/7;_البي【4;】ة #ا/604;ب/يئ&/#1577; #الأط ا&#/04/; #&#】1575;【604;بيئيين #】602;ا\; ة #البي\Jة【; #ا【ل/】صغار #ب¡/0;دي_&#/1571;ز&#】1585;ع @】env【iro/n/men】tfriendssocie\ty @efs_b\ahra\in\ /@】reem.efsA po\st shared by &【#1576;ر\;ناج ر【610; 【5; - REEM Pro】gram (@reem.\efs) on/ Nov 30, 2019 at 5】:34am PSTShare /this artic\leCopy/paste【 the artic】\le video embed link/ below:CopyShareTweetSharese】ndSha】reTweetSharesen/dMoreHideShareSendShareShareS\h\areSen】【\】dShareS】h/areYou might a】l】so like 】 \ 【 ‘Kokoro’ is celebrity 】chef 【Nobu/ Matsuhis\a’s se/【/cret ingredient \ / \ / 【 / Can UAE oyster f】a【rmers rival their global compet\itors? 【 \ \ / 】 【/ \ \ Globa/l energy deman】d debated at/ Abu Dhab/i Sus】tainability We/ek 【 / 】 / More aboutRecyclingFoodEnvironmental 】protec/tionUnited Arab Em/ir/ates Browse 【today'\s tag\sNEd1

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