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时间:2020-05-27 10:17:01 作者:穷游网 浏览量:61089

AG88导航网【ag88.shop】游戏厅捕鱼 mLmfrrN2MEPs backed p\la\ns on Wednesday\ aimed【 a】t improving /【the qua\lity \of drink】ing water and reduce pla】stic waste.T/he initiativ【e incl】udes】 p/roposals t\o sl【/ash the maximum limit\s of certain poll\utants and inc/rease access\ to\ free and safe wa】ter in public spaces across the EU.One \of the p\【rimary 【goals/ is to【 increase publ】ic trust in tap water with the intenti【on of dim\ini【shing the use 】】of /plasti\c w\ater bottles. Singl【e-use plas【tics/ are currentl【y t】he m/o/st common form of marine litter found on Europe\an【 beaches, according to \a r【ecent repo/rt.The European 【Parliament estimat\es these new po/licie\s woul/d s【ave【 Eu\ropea/n households over \€60【0m per year.Share this articleCopy/paste the ar/ticl/e video embed link【 b】elow:Copy】ShareTweetSharesen】dShareTwe/etSharesend\MoreHideShare\Se【ndSh/are【Sh/areShareSendShareShare】You m\igh/t also【 like/ \ 】 Micro-plastic\s 】a/re not just a problem for the oceans, the】y're now in \the air /】 【 \ 】 / 【 \ 【/ The wee【k in Europe: Rescu】e plans, MEPs on the】 fr】ontline/【【s & robo-helpers【 \ / \ Meet the 【MEPs returning to【 medicine amid/\ th/e c】oronavirus pandemic \ 【 / 】 More ab//ou【tEU Parliam/】entWat】erEnvironmental protec【ti】on \ 【 Browse today【's tagsBkrT

JBbQIn a tighten/【ed u】p policing of\ the】ir /fishin】g 】industry Thailand has beg】un intercepti\ng and ins【pecting fishing boats far o\ut at sea this ye】a】r, one of many\ n/e/w measures\/ to curb】 its dangerously high levels of overfishing【.【For d【ecades the Gulf of Thailand's fish stocks were p\lundered with abandon. Limits were ignored and b【oa\ts re【gul\arly worked in restri\cted areas, endangering【// speci/es with bar/ely 【any o/ve】rsight.Those fish\ went/ on to be exported, often ending up on the plates of cons【umers in Europe】.But \internati\onal pressure moun【t\ed in the \last few years, and since \the EU is the largest importer /of Thailand's fi【sh it managed to wield a lot of influe/nce.I【n 2015/ th\】e EU issued a &ldq【uo;yello【\w card,” wa\rning the /Thai government】 it would suspend its imp】orts 】if no/ a【ction was】 t】【ake【n, and in Janu】ary it was finally lifted \and a "green ca【rd" was awarded.The measu/res /Thailand has now adopted to\ satisfy th/e EU【 ra/nge from \new rules t\o vessel// monitoring systems, as well as a satellite-\based system\ of track/【in\】g the mo】v【ements \of fishing boats, enforced by the Royal Thai Navy.T【【hai officials say 】Europe&rsquo/;【s 【pr\es】sure has helpe】【d the/m to implem\【ent 】these reform】s, convincing the 【fisheri\es to accept t【ighte【ned control.&l\dquo【\;】As the biggest importer of】\【 the s\eaf【ood of t【he world, I thi【nk the EU is using 【its power trying to solve the probl】em. That&rsqu/o【;s \w【hy /we’re not c【om【pla/ining about the yello】【w card at【 al/l. And the yello\w card for /us is】 like 】a w】ake-up【 c】all: 】O\K, you know the pro【blem, no【w/ you ha/ve to 】wake 【up an】d do something】 s/ignificant,&rdq【uo; Adisorn P\romthep, the Director&nd/ash;Genera\l /of Thailand's Department o/f【 】Fisheries, told E】uron\ews.&】l/dquo;Sinc【e the yellow card was\ issued, the 【Commission and Thailand have\ eng【aged\ in a construc\tive process of c【ooperation and dialogue,&rdq\uo; the Europ\e【an Commission, 】the /executiv【e\ arm o】f th【e EU,】\ s【aid【 in \a statem\/ent in February announcing t\】h】e lifting of the card】.&【ldquo;Th/is has resul\ted in a major upgrade of t】【he Thai fis【heries g【ov/ernance, 】】in a/ccordan\ce w\i】th the internatio【nal commi】t/ments o\f the country.】”Thai seafood exports stoo/d at 1.85 bi【lli/on e【uros in 2017, Co/mmerce Min】istry】/ dat】a show, recovering to their 2014 l】evel/ after a drop i\n 2015 to 】.6 billion 【euros following the European Union\ w】arning.Ab/out 9.】9 perce】nt of Thai s/e】afood exports/ 【wen】t t\o the European Union last year, v】ersu\s 10.3 【percent i】n 2014, m】inistry d】ata sho【w.Jaroo\nsak Petchsri, Head of【 Thai R\egional Fisheri】es Patro】l, \has 【been /patr\olling the se/\as off Thailand for 30 】ye】ars sa//id 】he's noticed the difference."In the past, w/e didn&rsqu/【o;t really have much control\ over the f/isheries&h【ellip; They were depleting the sea,】 harvest/in【g fi\sh big and sma】ll, remo/ving it in spawni/【ng season】s. Now, with \the new la\ws,【 t【hese 【things h\ave ch/anged," he told Euronews.Even some of the fishing \captains】【 say/ - outwardly at leas【t - th/at they're fi/ne with the new 】s/【yst/e【m.】“I agree th【at all t//he i\llegal fishi【ng h【as to /end. We no】w hav【e a 】satellite tracker on our// bo\a\t, there are inspections 【at port】s, we l\og everything we】 do/ every d/ay, 】so it woul【d\ be really\ hard to d】o/ any illeg【al fishing n【ow,” Prasi\】tchai Woraratyanont, a fishing boat captain, told Eu\ronew/s.S【】amut\ Sakhon 【port, 40 ki/lome】t【res southwest of Bangkok, is one of 】Thailand’s largest.All large boats using it no【w hav\e to 】\re】po/rt to the authorit/ies before and after ever】y fishing trip. Officers use a new c【omput】er system analysing detailed information】 about each vessel and its journey at sea.【 If anything seems/ su/sp\ic【ious/, the system will automat【ically recom\me】nd a thor/ough inspection【.【“We consider \it v\ery important to educat】e t/he fisher/men a/nd explain to them what 【regulations they must fol\low. These insp【ections all/ow us【 t/o make su】r\e everything 【is in 【order as far as the vessel, the】 c/rew /and the\ catch \ar】e concerne\d," Sagultem Peera, head of the port'【s In/ Out Centre told Eu【ronews.And bac/k/ at the 【Department of Fisheries' brand new monitoring c\entre in B\angkok roughl//y 600Environmental】【ists' anger after Hung【ary cuts d【own EU-protected for\es\t fish\ing /vessels, all e/quipp【ed /with s\atellit】/e trackers, a\/re wat】ched aro\und the c【】lock.&l\【d/\quo;We a】re receiving data on the speed 【/and direction of each boat in r/eal t\ime. If a trawler ha【s sl\owed down, \】fishing in a restricted【 \zone, we&【rsquo;ll start /the procedure to intercept/,” Bundit K】ullavanijaya, Head /of Ve】ssel M【onitor【ing System /workgroup, Thailand Department of/ Fishe【rie\s, said.Containers with frozen fish are als/o inspected with x-r\ays and secured wit】h new ele】ctronic l【\ocks. 】/Be\fore, illegal/ catch】es from other count\ries could be shipped through Thailand to Europe.Thailand is jus】t one of many cou【ntries struggling with harmful fishing practices. An estima/ted one-fifth of all worldw【ide catches ar】e illegal, unreported, or /unr】eg/ulated — g【lobally that】’s 10 billion euros pe\r year./Som/e illegal catches w\ould often l\and in Thailand o\/n refrigerated cargo ships. So/me 【/o【f these huge vessels【 were【 getting t/hei\r/ d\aily catch from smaller,】 il/leg】al fishing/ boats on th/e high s【eas — a practice/ calle/d &ld/qu【o;fish laund】ering.&\rdquo;Now/ f】/oreign flag vess【e/ls are not al【l】owed i【nto T//h【ai ports any【more unless 【their cargo is/ 】properly c【【er/t\ifi【ed.“No/w 【that our laws hav\e been amend【ed, we ca【n cont/rol and inspect f/orei】gn flag v/e/ssels. The】\ sys\te\m is very comp【lete - we can 【trace every can of tuna b\ack/ to the v/e【ssel tha【t caught it,"\ Jama【ree Rakbanglea\m, the Port State Measures Inspec】tor, told Euronews.121212121212121212Share this articl/eCopy/paste the 【article\ video embed link below/:Cop【】yShareT【weetShar】esendShareTweetSharesendMoreHid\eShareSendShareShareShareSend】ShareShare【You mig【h【\t also like / 【 Why \did it tak/e /3.5 years f/or T【hail【【and to get【 rid of t【h/e EU’s \illegal fishing 】�【39;/yellow /card'? 【 / / More about\F【ishe/ryThailandOceanEnvir】o/n\mental prote/c】tion / / \ Most viewed 】 】 【 \ What influe/nc/e o【n c【limat\e is【 the【 coronavirus lockdown really having? 】 / 【 \ T/he new AI syst【em safeguard【ing】 p【remature bab/ies from infection / \ Messenge\r RNA: the molecule\ that may 】teach/ our】 b【o】dies to beat cancer 】 【 \ /【 / Apple and Google say they\'ll work together】 to /t】race \spr/ead of co\/ronavirus vi【a sm\artphones 】【 】 \ Ho【w EU fu\nding is cha/nging the】 】face o【f Lat【\via】n innovation 】 【 】 Browse toda/y's tagsNPel

uh7wRobinson Crusoe isl\and sets example】 fo】】r/ 】the world in con\ser/vationZVkpYjLl

UYqlTe】xt 】si/zeAa/AaThe Danis【h retail\ entrepreneu【r/ and philanthro/pis【t Anders Holc【h Povlsen is already Scotland’s larges【t\ private \land owner. Now he /is/ submitt/ing plans to\ bui/l/d a new】 tourist hub in 】a rem】\ote Highl【and town, amid protest from locals who claim sm】all\ busi\nesses will be driven【 out./The proposed /tourist attraction would be erected in the s\mall village of T【ongue, loca/ted halfw/ay up\ 【the/ sce】nic 【No【r】th Coas】t\ 500 touring route. Tong【ue 【already\ comprise】s of a yo\u\【t\h host\el, craft shop, gen/eral\ \store and \gara/ge, a bank, a 【post off】ice【【 and two hotels.For Povlsen, who【se\】 n/et worth is in the regi/on of €8 billi\on, the goal 】is to/ creat【e a community 【【space in what is des【c\ribed as a “lo/st” a】rea 】of the Highlands【.Anders】 Holch PovlsenAPBo AmstrupThe live planning application/ is being put【 foward 】by Wildland Lim\ited, P】ovlsen】’s self-】m\ade conservation project, wh/ich aims to ad【vance the “sustainable/ 【development of some of Scotland’s most ru\gged, precious and/ 】beautiful landscapes.”What will the】 new village\ be like】?If approv】ed, the vi\llage to\ be【\ called ‘Bur//r’s Stores&rsq】uo;, will consist\】 of 【a /range of amenities inc【luding a】 rest】aurant,】 bakeh】ouse, a shop sellin\g local and se\asonal prod\uce, an even】ts space,【 accommodation】 for staff an\d visitors, new fuel pumps and】 a microbrewery.Acc\ordi/ng to T/\he Heral【d Sc【o】】t\la\/n\d, 】su】ch plans would 】&l【dquo;transform【” /the village and &】ldquo;restore the area to its f\or/mer glory \[]\ whi/le maintaining【 its h\istor\ic c【harac】ter/.&rdquo】; U/nder】 design【\ princ】iples in the/ plann】【ing ap\pl】/ication\, Wi\ldland Limited also claim that the village will “be s【ustainable 】\and respect the n【atural beau/ty” of the area and\ prior/itise /pedestrians.Vision of the/ villageWil】\dland Limite\dEve】nts space for c/\ultural/live music eventsWild】l【\and LimitedBurr'【s Stores 【pr】】opose\d imagesWi\ldland LimitedWill the\ plan/s negatively affect local bus【iness/es?So far, Tongue, Melness and Skerray Co【mmunity 】Council, Kyl/e 】/of Tongue /Hostel and the Ben Loya【l Hotel have a【ll object\ed the plans. “This is n】ot\ fair comp】et【iti】on for other accommodatio\n providers i】n the area 【and will d/irectl\y d/isplace\ business from 】us and other providers,&\rd/quo; 】Suza】\n\ne Mackay,】 【owne/r of\ the Kyle /of\ Tongue Hostel】 and H\olid/ay P\ark, to【ld the Daily M/ail.&ldquo/;Tr】ying to\ compete with a company that has no nee\d to m\ake /a profit is uns/u\s【tain\able,” ag】rees /Sarah Fo】/x from the 】B/en Loyal Hotel.Wil【dland L【imited 】tells Eurone\ws Living that this wil【l in no way be a \tou【rist &lsq】uo;resort’ and is rather a “collection of sensitive【ly re\s\【tored buildin】gs,/ which may house c【afes, small retail\ers and c\o【mmunity spaces.”Highlands, Sc\otlandU【nsplashIn r/esponse to complaints, a spokesperson fro】m】 the/ company co【mmen【ted “we are 【act/ively lis\tening to the views of【 \the com\muni/ty.” They adde】d, “the revitalisati\on of this part of the village w【ill, of course, be a highly colla/\borative effort, with a strong focus】 on complementing Tongue&rsq】/uo;s already】 estimabl\e visitor attr】a】ctions.&rdqu】o\; Ultimately【, &】ldquo;l\eaving this\ site/ to become dereli\ct/ is\ not a【n option,”】 they concl\uded/.The planning document\ states that facil】ities /for both tourists and locals will &/【ldquo;n\ot negative【ly 【】impact 【upon ne/ighbourin】g b】u】【sinesses.”【When asked about h【is conservation p/ro\jec/ts by property cons\ultanc】y Knight Frank, Povlse【n co【mmented, /&ldquo/;you/ might call it philanthropy, 】I\ prefer to think of /it as investing in the natural】 world.”Sha【re this\/ articl\e 【 More from/ pla】cespeER

oVLYFamily-run fish/eries struggle /as \new generati\on casts net wider6MOu

CT5WTide turns f/or an Italian coas\tal wa/steland【/bcta

In a tighten/【ed u】p policing of\ the】ir /fishin】g 】industry Thailand has beg】un intercepti\ng and ins【pecting fishing boats far o\ut at sea this ye】a】r, one of many\ n/e/w measures\/ to curb】 its dangerously high levels of overfishing【.【For d【ecades the Gulf of Thailand's fish stocks were p\lundered with abandon. Limits were ignored and b【oa\ts re【gul\arly worked in restri\cted areas, endangering【// speci/es with bar/ely 【any o/ve】rsight.Those fish\ went/ on to be exported, often ending up on the plates of cons【umers in Europe】.But \internati\onal pressure moun【t\ed in the \last few years, and since \the EU is the largest importer /of Thailand's fi【sh it managed to wield a lot of influe/nce.I【n 2015/ th\】e EU issued a &ldq【uo;yello【\w card,” wa\rning the /Thai government】 it would suspend its imp】orts 】if no/ a【ction was】 t】【ake【n, and in Janu】ary it was finally lifted \and a "green ca【rd" was awarded.The measu/res /Thailand has now adopted to\ satisfy th/e EU【 ra/nge from \new rules t\o vessel// monitoring systems, as well as a satellite-\based system\ of track/【in\】g the mo】v【ements \of fishing boats, enforced by the Royal Thai Navy.T【【hai officials say 】Europe&rsquo/;【s 【pr\es】sure has helpe】【d the/m to implem\【ent 】these reform】s, convincing the 【fisheri\es to accept t【ighte【ned control.&l\dquo【\;】As the biggest importer of】\【 the s\eaf【ood of t【he world, I thi【nk the EU is using 【its power trying to solve the probl】em. That&rsqu/o【;s \w【hy /we’re not c【om【pla/ining about the yello】【w card at【 al/l. And the yello\w card for /us is】 like 】a w】ake-up【 c】all: 】O\K, you know the pro【blem, no【w/ you ha/ve to 】wake 【up an】d do something】 s/ignificant,&rdq【uo; Adisorn P\romthep, the Director&nd/ash;Genera\l /of Thailand's Department o/f【 】Fisheries, told E】uron\ews.&】l/dquo;Sinc【e the yellow card was\ issued, the 【Commission and Thailand have\ eng【aged\ in a construc\tive process of c【ooperation and dialogue,&rdq\uo; the Europ\e【an Commission, 】the /executiv【e\ arm o】f th【e EU,】\ s【aid【 in \a statem\/ent in February announcing t\】h】e lifting of the card】.&【ldquo;Th/is has resul\ted in a major upgrade of t】【he Thai fis【heries g【ov/ernance, 】】in a/ccordan\ce w\i】th the internatio【nal commi】t/ments o\f the country.】”Thai seafood exports stoo/d at 1.85 bi【lli/on e【uros in 2017, Co/mmerce Min】istry】/ dat】a show, recovering to their 2014 l】evel/ after a drop i\n 2015 to 】.6 billion 【euros following the European Union\ w】arning.Ab/out 9.】9 perce】nt of Thai s/e】afood exports/ 【wen】t t\o the European Union last year, v】ersu\s 10.3 【percent i】n 2014, m】inistry d】ata sho【w.Jaroo\nsak Petchsri, Head of【 Thai R\egional Fisheri】es Patro】l, \has 【been /patr\olling the se/\as off Thailand for 30 】ye】ars sa//id 】he's noticed the difference."In the past, w/e didn&rsqu/【o;t really have much control\ over the f/isheries&h【ellip; They were depleting the sea,】 harvest/in【g fi\sh big and sma】ll, remo/ving it in spawni/【ng season】s. Now, with \the new la\ws,【 t【hese 【things h\ave ch/anged," he told Euronews.Even some of the fishing \captains】【 say/ - outwardly at leas【t - th/at they're fi/ne with the new 】s/【yst/e【m.】“I agree th【at all t//he i\llegal fishi【ng h【as to /end. We no】w hav【e a 】satellite tracker on our// bo\a\t, there are inspections 【at port】s, we l\og everything we】 do/ every d/ay, 】so it woul【d\ be really\ hard to d】o/ any illeg【al fishing n【ow,” Prasi\】tchai Woraratyanont, a fishing boat captain, told Eu\ronew/s.S【】amut\ Sakhon 【port, 40 ki/lome】t【res southwest of Bangkok, is one of 】Thailand’s largest.All large boats using it no【w hav\e to 】\re】po/rt to the authorit/ies before and after ever】y fishing trip. Officers use a new c【omput】er system analysing detailed information】 about each vessel and its journey at sea.【 If anything seems/ su/sp\ic【ious/, the system will automat【ically recom\me】nd a thor/ough inspection【.【“We consider \it v\ery important to educat】e t/he fisher/men a/nd explain to them what 【regulations they must fol\low. These insp【ections all/ow us【 t/o make su】r\e everything 【is in 【order as far as the vessel, the】 c/rew /and the\ catch \ar】e concerne\d," Sagultem Peera, head of the port'【s In/ Out Centre told Eu【ronews.And bac/k/ at the 【Department of Fisheries' brand new monitoring c\entre in B\angkok roughl//y 600At the s\troke of midnight on Tuesday, Italy said good\bye to c\otton bu】ds, as \the New Year ushe/red】 in 【the country\'s latest push to eliminate single\-use plastic produc】【ts./】Fro/m Ja【nuary 1, it is forbidd/en to/ \pr【\od\uce\ or 】\【sel【l /non-biodegradable or comp\ostable cotton buds.】/ Packaging will also h】ave【 to indicate 【the rule\s/ 【for proper 【di【sposal.Cotton buds account for\ about 9% of waste f【oun/d on 】Italian\ beac\h【e【s】 &/mda/sh; an average of about 60 sticks per beac/h.Italy is the fi【rst European Un【ion country to implement\ s【uch a ban but it won't be the last. In O/ctober, th/e European Parliament voted t\o o【utl】aw most/ si/ngle/-use plastics, start/ing【\ in 20/21.Next New Year's Day, Italy will\ bring i【n【 a\ ban on【 c【o\smetics cont/a【ining microplastics. T【hese are tiny plas【tics g】r】ai\ns found in some exf/oliants and】 detergents 【t\ha】t end \u【p in river】s \and seas, whe】re they are e\aten by fish【 an】d integrated into the【 food chain.Brussels has warned that by 2】050 th】ere wil/l be more 【plastic in th【e /oceans than fish, if nothing is done.Shar\e t/hi/s \articleShareTweetSha【resendShareT\wee【tShar【e【sendMoreHideShareSendSh【areSh\areShareSendShareShareYo/u might a\lso like 【 2/018 Review【: Single-】use plastics to be ban\ned \in EU 【 / 】 【 】 \ QUIZ: So you /think y\ou know about plastic pollution? Test your knowledge now / \ \ / Which Europea【】n countries are th【e \best and worst/ /at r【ec】y\clin\g plastic【 waste/? 】【 【 【 More aboutplasticMicroplasticsEn/vir】onm【【ental protection / Bro】wse tod【\ay's tags fish\ing /vessels, all e/quipp【ed /with s\atellit】/e trackers, a\/re wat】ched aro\und the c【】lock.&l\【d/\quo;We a】re receiving data on the speed 【/and direction of each boat in r/eal t\ime. If a trawler ha【s sl\owed down, \】fishing in a restricted【 \zone, we&【rsquo;ll start /the procedure to intercept/,” Bundit K】ullavanijaya, Head /of Ve】ssel M【onitor【ing System /workgroup, Thailand Department of/ Fishe【rie\s, said.Containers with frozen fish are als/o inspected with x-r\ays and secured wit】h new ele】ctronic l【\ocks. 】/Be\fore, illegal/ catch】es from other count\ries could be shipped through Thailand to Europe.Thailand is jus】t one of many cou【ntries struggling with harmful fishing practices. An estima/ted one-fifth of all worldw【ide catches ar】e illegal, unreported, or /unr】eg/ulated — g【lobally that】’s 10 billion euros pe\r year./Som/e illegal catches w\ould often l\and in Thailand o\/n refrigerated cargo ships. So/me 【/o【f these huge vessels【 were【 getting t/hei\r/ d\aily catch from smaller,】 il/leg】al fishing/ boats on th/e high s【eas — a practice/ calle/d &ld/qu【o;fish laund】ering.&\rdquo;Now/ f】/oreign flag vess【e/ls are not al【l】owed i【nto T//h【ai ports any【more unless 【their cargo is/ 】properly c【【er/t\ifi【ed.“No/w 【that our laws hav\e been amend【ed, we ca【n cont/rol and inspect f/orei】gn flag v/e/ssels. The】\ sys\te\m is very comp【lete - we can 【trace every can of tuna b\ack/ to the v/e【ssel tha【t caught it,"\ Jama【ree Rakbanglea\m, the Port State Measures Inspec】tor, told Euronews.121212121212121212Share this articl/eCopy/paste the 【article\ video embed link below/:Cop【】yShareT【weetShar】esendShareTweetSharesendMoreHid\eShareSendShareShareShareSend】ShareShare【You mig【h【\t also like / 【 Why \did it tak/e /3.5 years f/or T【hail【【and to get【 rid of t【h/e EU’s \illegal fishing 】�【39;/yellow /card'? 【 / / More about\F【ishe/ryThailandOceanEnvir】o/n\mental prote/c】tion / / \ Most viewed 】 】 【 \ What influe/nc/e o【n c【limat\e is【 the【 coronavirus lockdown really having? 】 / 【 \ T/he new AI syst【em safeguard【ing】 p【remature bab/ies from infection / \ Messenge\r RNA: the molecule\ that may 】teach/ our】 b【o】dies to beat cancer 】 【 \ /【 / Apple and Google say they\'ll work together】 to /t】race \spr/ead of co\/ronavirus vi【a sm\artphones 】【 】 \ Ho【w EU fu\nding is cha/nging the】 】face o【f Lat【\via】n innovation 】 【 】 Browse toda/y's tags

X3qWHow the EU stamped dow\n on de/c\ades of【 illeg\al【 fishing \in T\hai\landCbh7

ZyIpThe big, bea/【utiful Baltic Sea 【/hides /a dirty secret in its 377,00】0km of water.A\ 【number of agricultural/ spills has turned t】he Baltic【 into one of /t/he most /pol】lu\ted】 seas in】 the wor】ld, due to excess nitrogen \and phos\phorus lacing it】s wat【ers.This process of eutrophication ha\s【 led to \the de\pl/etion \/of oxyg】en and /an【 overg\】rowt【h of algae in the body o【f wa】ter, 【but not 【al\l h】ope/ is 【】lo】st.\Eutrophication ex/p】lai【nedAn unlik】ely assist/an】tMussel farms lik\e【 Kieler Meeresfarm【 in the Germ【an port city of Kie】l are ho/p】ing 【to ma【ke a dif】f【eren】ce in th/e 【Baltic'】s/ increasin\g【ly di【fficult fight\ against algae.Hundreds o【f tho】usands of th\ese mighty mol/lus\cs wo/rk to filter the water eve/ry day by\ eating their way through microsc】opic a\lg】ae.Kieler Meeresfarm 】is just one f】arm taking pa\rt in Balt/ic Blue Growth, an experimental【 Europe/an pro】ject coordinated based in\ Sweden's Ostergötland region.Th【e】 p/roj【ect is worth 4.6 million Euros, with/ 3.6 million 】Euros coming from regional aid under the EU Coh/esion Policy. 18【 partners in six B【altic co【untrie】s are taking p/art.All six participating farms/ are locate】d in importa【nt】 strategic locations across th\/e Baltic region/.The farms are all in close co】n\t【act with \each】 other, sharing techn/iques and /ideas despite having diffe/rent\ experiences.Kieler】 Me】eresfarm f】ounder Tim Sr【a\ufenberge/r \says '】'I'm having【 here diffe【rent【 conditions th【\an in Sweden. So w/ha【t 】works for me doesn't really wo】rk in】 Swed\en and/ vi/ce versa b\ut we 【can talk\ to each other and have that \shari【ng of i/deas.''T【he wate】\r quality and transparency is mea】sured twice a year and researc\h】ers sa】y that the results ar【e conclusive.1212121212121212More than/】 just mu【ssels\NGO Coas\【tal Union Germany, EUCC, is 】als】o helping to raise soci】al awa/ren/ess on imp/ro\ving water qual】ity.EUCC has cre【at【e】d a number of databases and learning tools for intern【a】tional networ】ks, providing\ relevant i】】nform【/at【ion, wo】rkshops /and 】conferenc\es about/ the im/porta/nce /of usin】g】 musse/【ls to impro】v/e wa】te/r qualit/【y i/n \the Baltic Sea.Looking to the futureThe project's ultima】te aim is \to bring r【eal change to the【 Baltic Sea region.This i】\s 【expected to be done in revolutionis/ing\ the us】e o/f /musse/】l meal for ani【mal feed. The【 project is expe【】cted to also at\tract int/erest from broader \markets,/ at/tracting /entrepreneur/s /and in\vestment in mussel m\eal as a viable alternative to curre【nt\ animal feed.Watch s】ome of【 ou【r social media coverageShare this】 ar】t【icleC\opy/】paste the ar\//ticle video em【be\】d link below:Cop】y【\ShareTweetSharesendShareTweetSharese\ndMoreHideShareSendSh】areShareShareS【end/ShareShareYo】u mi/ght also like/ / \ / 【 Devise【 P【roject: Ireland puts the spotli\ght on digital/ SMEs / \ / 【 More aboutContamination of waterEn【vironmental 】protecti】/\onF/aun】a and F【loraGermany Browse today'\;s tags2wgH

sRFPNe】w edible in-flight meal t/ray designed for【 plane jo】ur【neysE4jq

yFn0Living Recommends | Rewilding our relati】onship with ou//r wardrobeH61F

ZHBCSmall】, independent fisheries are slo\w/l【y making 】their return after almost being wiped 【out by Denma【rk【's d\ecisio】n to privati\se f\ishing 【qu】\【otas a 【de\cade a/go【, whi/ch allowed big companies to assert their d】ominance in/ t】he f/ishing market.The\ EU\&rsqu/o\;s Common \Fish\eries Policy le】ave\s it up to member states to decide how to allocate i\t//s n【】ational fi】shing qu/ota 】to\ its fishing fle\et.With market prices】 skyr\ocketing】, small fis】heries 】were pushed to sell the/ir \boats and leave the 【trade.So/me fishe\rmen say】【 the beam t\r\awl/ers also】】 had a de】t/rim【ental 【environmental impact b】y\ damaging seabeds.】W\orking /to】/getherF\ish【ermen in the North W/estern town of Thorups】trand decided it was time to take actio【n 【to /ensure their to/wn】, an/d oth【er /fishing vil】lage\s weren't wiped【 off the map by the quota sys\】tem.Cooperatives were es/ta】\blis\hed to all【ow fishermen to band t】ogether, bu/y\ and share quotas【 am\ongst t/he\mselves】.T/h】is also ensured traditional boat making, a D\anish i\con /】sin【ce the Viki】\ng【 ti】mes, has been able 【t】o thrive\ on【ce mo/re.The European\ Union has also seen the potential in this\, partially fun\ding a boatyard to build vessels and t】rain n/ew craftsmen, in turn\ cr\】e【ating local opportunities f\or ele\ctricians an\d engi/neers, as well as an 【attr【action for tourists.S】mall sc\ale fishin/g【 in Eur\opeThe European Union recog【nises the i【mp】ortance of small 】scale/ fi】she/【【ries \acr\oss the con/tinent, invest/ing an es】timated 212.4 million Eu】ros (the /estimated total\ p\ublic budget】 target【ed on small\ scal【e】 fisheries, EMF】F) into various projects ov】er 】20】14-2020.In the Me【diterranean and Black Sea /regions, small s\cale fisheries repres【ent over 80% of t/\he】 t【o/tal fishing fleet a】nd】 employ over 60% of t【he to【ta/【l workforce within the sector.\Cat\ch of【 the dayWith sustainable sea\fo】o【d a gro/wing food t/rend, Thorups【tran\d 【/has set up shop in one of the world's cul/in/ary capit\als.The】 town has entered th】e lucrative Copenhagen market,】 selli【ng fresh fis/h on a】 co\n\verted【】 boat in the heart of the city centre\.Ch【ef Simon Biggas M&o【slash\;【lle【r say\s\ /he hopes Thorupstrand will help to inspire ot\her to【wn\s to 【follow 【suit and】 embrace sust【a【inable f/is】h【ing coop/e】ratives.12 】 【 OCEAN EP5 - Smal【【l scale fishe\ri】es / \ / 【 】 12 / \ 【 / / 】 OCEAN EP5 - Small scale fisher】ies 】 / 】 1【2 】】 / 【 OCEAN EP5 - S【mall s【cale fisheries \ 【 / 【 12 】 【 \ / OCEAN \/EP5 - Smal/l scale f\isheries 【 / \】12 】 OCEAN EP5 - Small scale fish\er/ies 】 】 【 【 / 12 \ 】 】 【 \ 【 / OCEAN EP/5 - Small scale //fisheries 】 / 】/ / \ 12 【【 / 】【 【/ /\ 】 】 OC【EAN EP5 - Small s【cale【 fish/eries \ 【 【【 / 】 12 【 OCEAN EP5 - Sm/all 】scal\e/ fisheries 】 12 / \ 】 / \ / \ OCEAN 【E/P5 - Small scale /fisheries \ \ 】 \ / 】\ Journalist na\me • Denis 】Loct/ierVi\deo ed【itor • Je【an-Christophe Marca】】udShare/ this a】rticleCopy/paste the article video em】bed link below:CopyShareTweetSharesendSh/a【r】eTweetShares/endMoreH/ideShareSendShare】ShareSha/reSendShareSh\are】You might also like 【【 / / / Acti】vists 】are raising \funds to save Da【ni【sh woo】den boats \ More /】aboutF\isheryEnvironmen/tal pr【otec【ti】onDenmark 【 Most viewed / / What influence o【n climate is the coronavirus 【lockdown\ r/eally\ havin/g? 【 Th【e new AI system sa\feguardin】\g premature babies fro】m infection / \ 】 Messen】ger RNA: the molecule th/at/ may【 teach o】ur bo/d】\ies to bea\t cance\r / 】 【 】 \ \ / \ \Apple/ and Google sa【y they/'ll w//ork together to trace spread of coronavirus /via smartphones\ 【 】 【 】 】 How EU fund\in/g is changin【g the face of L【atvi】an innovation Browse t】oday's tagsJJjI

hSYAI【】schia: Ital\ian island at risk of qu\akes or eruptions【 'in the hands of 】the Eternal Father&【#039;pes8

WYxBMEPs ba/ck initiati\ve to reduce p/lastic waste a\n\d improve water quality27RR

merUAn international ag\reeme\nt signed in 2018 pre【ventively banned all【】 commercial fishing】 in \the【【 】Central Arct【ic Ocean —【 long befor【e any 】fishi【ng could /\real】istically begin. Why was that ban necessary, and how can marine biologists 【ta/ke advantage of】 planned po【lar/ expedition\s to/ f/ind out more about future fishing prospects in the Arct【/ic \high seas?Dr. Pauline Snoeijs 【Leijonmalm, Professor of Marine Ecol【o】gy a【t S】tockholm University, talked to E/uronews hours before lea【ving Troms&os】lash【;, Norway onbo\ard the Po\larstern\ icebreaker f【or the MOSAiC \expedition at the Nort\h Pole.She bega/n by explaining【 \w/hy we n】eed a fishing ba\n in the region:“We don/’t kn【ow a】nything abou【】/t 【the ecosystem,【 and\ we don’t kno【w anyt】h【ing about which fish we\ have! It’s a very /nutr【i/e】nt-poor ecosystem,\ so I expect ver/y little fish. And then if you st【art fishing, th【en you can destroy the ecosy/stem, or th/e balance of the organisms."MOSAiC Exped/ition'/s research camera【Once th】e/ ic】e disappe】ars, there \could be a ru\sh to fish\ t\he are【a\, which lies outside the exclusive eco】nomic zon\e of th【e\ coastal countries“\So that’s 】why we ne【】ed to kno\w】 now what /we have in this sea that perhaps can be/ exp/loited by anyone," P】rofessor Leijonmalm explains.【 "And 】】of course, we need prot【ectio】n for this are【】a. So what we’re going to do i【【】s to build\ a way to protect thi\s ar【ea 【by c/】ol/lect【ing b【ase】line【 data.&l/d【q/uo;We】 are at the very/ beginning of this/.\ What we are doi\ng is now mappi/ng, and this is t\he first expedi\t】ion tha】t&rs\quo;s going to map. And \the big advantage of conn【ecting\ to such【 a big exp/edition is t】hat we get all the environmental data【】 from the ship’s 】program &】mdash;】 s/o we【 do no】t need to】 /\measure the】 chlorophyll /our【se】lves, or the 】【nutrients, or not【 even th\e zooplan【】】kt】on. We \need o】nly to look【 a】t the fish】, and the other data【 we can use, and connect then】 the fi】sh data t\o. /So that’s/ a very big adv【\a【n\tage of these【【 big expeditions./&rdqu【o;/Pol】arstern ic/ebreaker sets sail】 for the North PoleShare thi\】s art/】\icl/eCopy/pas【te th【e /article video embed \link \below:Cop\yShareTweetShar【esen【dShare\T\w【eetShare【sendMoreHideS】hareSendShareShare/Sha】reSendSha\reShareMore aboutGlobal warming and climate changeFisheryArcticEnviro【nmenta/l protectionGreenland / Mo】s】t v\iewed 【 Wh【at i\nfluence on climate】\ is the cor/o/navirus lockdown really having? \ 【 】 】 】 \ 】 / The new AI system s\【【af【eg【uarding prematu】re【 /babies from infectio】n 】 \ 【 Messe\nger RN】A: the molecule that ma/y teach our bodies to \beat cancer 【 /\ 】 \ App/le\ and G】o\【ogle 】say they'll wo/rk \togethe【r to 】trace sprea\d of cor【onavirus via smartphon】es 【 】 \ \ How EU funding /is ch/ang】ing the face 【o/f Latvia\n innovation 】 】 】 【 \ Bro\wse today/'s【 ta\gsAI9A

zlmiText siz】eAaAaThese days, paying to \plan/t trees or inves】ting in g/reen projects as】 a way 】to balan\ce out your carbon emissions is a pretty stan\dard method o】f easing your en【vironm【ental conscienc】e. K/nown as car【bon offsettin\g, the process /has spawned a thriving business 】mak/i\ng billions of euros every year as com【panie【s /trade c】\a/】r【\bon credit\s to reach cli\mate c/hange g\oals.Yo/u can 】now even 】offset to und/o you\r own 】personal envi\r】onmenta\l damage, with a\irlines and organisat【ions offering /to he/lp you tak/e full resp【onsibi】l【ity】 for yo/ur 【residual emissions. For/ a small fee, o【/f \c/】\ourse. I【ncreasingly, however【, this s/ustain/ability】【 sol】u\t】io\n has come under】 fi【r】e from activists as being 】little\ more than/ gr【ee/n【washing. Criti【c/s have comp【ared【 \it to the practice of/ selli【ng indulgences\ /in the ancient Ca\tholic church; you can live\ h/ow】 you want as】 long as y【ou ha【ve the money/ to buy】 off your sins.What if, ins】tead of ma】king environmental protect【ion a side \issue, busine】ss】es made the\se 】kinds of carbon-】absorbing p/rojects a part\ of the new no【rmal/?Restoring biodiv】e\rsi【tyTi/】lmann/ Silbe】r, director 】of/ sustainable supp【ly\ chains】 for enviro/nmental expert, South P/ol】e, di【scus】ses how imp/\ortant a completely new approach c/ould】 be in allowi【ng b/【rands to show they/ are seriou【s abou\t fighting climate c/h/ang\e.“In/setting is derived from o/ffsetting【, as the name suggests,&rdquo】; Silber ex【plains. Wh/ere】 offsetting【 works to outso\urce to part】n】er 】\/organis】ations, insetting finds【\ ways to add/ /carbon miti/gating enterprises into t】he process of producing the product. “They would/ be looking for【 pr【ojects i\n or 【】close to their 】/supply 】\chain.”Convent】ional car【bon neutralising usuall【y i\nvolves investing in】 projects u\nre/lat\ed\ to【 produc】ts, b\ut insetting instead addr/e】sses a company’s balance wi\th \the\ ecosystem directly. B\urberry】, for\ example, recently announ【ced th/at it wou【ld b/e /partnering with PUR Projet 【to improve carbon ca/】ptur【e on farms run by their wool \producers 】in Australia. Restorin】g the biod】iversi\ty of these 】habitat/s helps cap/ture CO2 from the atmosphe【re /but also ensures th\e future of the land】scape.Where off】setting is re【active, makin】g changes】 internally is i/nte\n【ded【 to anticipate potent】ial negative s【oc【ial and env\ironmen【tal im\pacts before /they even happen. Ultima/tely the goa【l is to provid】/e a net p】osi\tive outcome.Burbe【/rry is helping to restore biodiversity fo】r】【 sheep farmer/s】 i/n Australia.U/nsplash【Is our addiction to Spotify ruini/n】g the planet? The【 environme/ntal \cost of st】reaming is\ invisi/bleS】yntheti】c palm oil bei【ng b】rewed 】like beer gets Bill Gates' inv【estm】entScie/ntists have work\e\d out \how to generate 】elect/ri/city fro/\m th【【in 【/airMak/i【ng important investmentsInsetting c/an be expensive to set u\p, but t】here is a range o】f/ benefits beyond\ purely financial【 rew/ards. “It improves【 /the resilience【 of the \supply \chain by investing/ w】her\e it is most vulnerable,&r【dquo; Silber says.\ Farmers and w【or【kers 【in areas where compa\nies set up p【rojects like this end up w】\ith greater security in thei【r/ i\】ncom】e, less/【 environmental po/llution, and【 regeneration o【f the ecosystem tha\t they rely on to \live.Bu【t big bu/si/nesses \have to work t【ogether with th\e people that\ g】row their material【s, to make s【【ure that these changes actually w/ork. &l】d】q【uo;There ha/s to be 【a p【artnership ap/proach, it’s not sust【ainable】【 to force farmers to make changes\,” explains Silber./ &ldqu/o;It’s not e\no】ugh to just make \it financ\ially\ attractive in the shor\t-ter【m, that m/eans a farmer sig】ns up for 5 to 【10 \years and【 the】】n stops doing it.”Feedback fro\m co【mmun/ities i/s essential【 to ensur\i/ng that i/nsetting is su】ccessf】ul.\ Unsustai【nab【le practice/s ca\】n【 be ex\ploitative 】and d/amagin/g to loc【a【l e\cosystems,【 pre【venting/ farmers \fr/om being \abl】e to ensure a secure income long-term. Making sure t【hat people feel they are being liste】ned t【o encou【rages th/em to\ continue\ fa【rming and pass on skills to future\ ge/n\erations. A positive mo【ve for local/ farmers, workers and for t【h/【e co\mpanie】】s employing them.So】 how cent/ral is ins【etting to a net】-zero future?】 】Silbe/r 】thinks it is definite】ly b【ecoming m/or//e】 mainst【rea\m, /whi】ch i/s good for e\miss/i【ons goals, b【ut it’\s risky and may\ not be possible for every】body. “Not 】everybody can move at the s/ame pa\ce wh【ich m/eans 】offsettin【g is still important,” he says. Technical skills f【rom more con/ven【tional emissions projects】 are also essential a】nd mea/n \th//at busine\sses end】 up working with many of the same /partners th】ey were bef/o\【re.Carbon i\nse【tting is about more th】an just \tree planting.Lukas\ Rodr/iguez/ PexelsIs inset\ting \just ano】ther way to plant trees?】Planting trees is just one way of b\ringing carbon】 emission absorbi\ng practices【 i/nto th【e su】pply chain. The idea/ could expand to include be/tter recycling facilitie/s, i/nves/ting 【in\【 energy ef/】ficiency o】r even projects impr/oving commuting 【options for employ\ees, a 】】paper\ by 】Eco\metrica\ sug\ges【ts. The【】se kind/s 】o【f changes a【/re lik】ely 【to b\e【 a lot】 \easier and cheaper to achie/ve,】 mak\ing them appealing to businesses /looki/ng t】o communicate their green crede/ntials.Often a ris/ky and expensive investmen【t/, however,】 \it 【could be a【 long】/ time be】fore re\gener/a【tive environ】men/tal projects become mainstream. In the near 】future\, buying a/bsolution by asking a company to offset your emis/si【ons will pro【ba/bly remain the approach for most. Ecometrica re】ckons tha】t thanks\ to the fact t\hat the/y become a part of 】the way a product/ is made,\ carbon inse\】tt【i\ng pr【ojects ar/e likely t】o be a better bet for\ 】sustainability in the】 lo/ng-term.Share this article More from lifeVwRd

pPD4How the EU stamped dow\n on de/c\ades of【 illeg\al【 fishing \in T\hai\landUWcR

U02wEasy【Jet unveils plans to become world&】#0//9;s first carb/on-】neutr】al airlineXunk

z5eaText s】izeAaAaBlack /cavi【ar was \a delicacy alread【y back i\n the 】】days of Gen\ghis Khan in the\ 12’s. In the 1550&rsqu\】】o;s】, Fra/ncois Rabela\is called it/ the finest pre-main-course/ tre\at out there. The kings and the tsars【 of Euro\pe】 enjoyed th\i】】【s\ fine food throughout the centuries. I【n our days, the roe of stur\geon is synonymous with luxurious living on 】televis】ion (think James Bond) and】 in real life.Getting the c】aviar, h/owever, is in】herently unsustainab\le: to get the fish eggs, f\e【male fish a】re hauled out【 of the waters s【hortly before they are me/ant to spawn and 【sliced open for t/hei/r row, which r】esu/lts in their death. So it is【 hardly a surprise that the s】【tu【rgeon’【s numbers h/a【ve been in an ala\rmingly rapid de【cline, so much so that in【 2001 a UN conventio/n banned fishing sturge\on in \its natu\ral habit/at altogether.A young sturgeon \fishK【asperskianTh】e key wo/rds are &ldq\uo;in its natural habitat&rdq\uo;. The ban/ made the br【ightest/ minds in bio/logy thin】k of \w】ays t【o get /】t【he female sturgeon’s precious cargo without bre【ak【ing the/ law. To circum\vent/ this piece of legislation, the most ob\vious \method was 】t\o cr/】eate fi【sh farms, whic\h technically do not /constitute a nat】ural environment. Such fish farms are quite 【c】ommon in China a/n】d slightly less so in Russia and Nort】h Amer\ica. B【ut to get this 【caviar to th\e】 European market 】with/out【 it \rottin\g, C】hinese pr【】oducers are【 forced to 】use/ /che/mical preservati\ves, which a/re banned/ i】n Japan a\nd in the US – b【ut 【not in Euro【pe.I\f you】&rsqu/【】o;re a fan of 】the delicacy, he/re&rsquo\;s /the good news: there is a h【andful of b/lack caviar producers \/out t【here/ that【 】are\】 \do\ing it【 sustainably &ndash\】; without killing the fis/h – thanks to a method wh\ereby\ the eggs are “mas】saged&【\】rdquo\; out right before spawn\ing. The/ sligh/tly 【worse news is that】 tho【se fish eggs】 /are pa\steu【rized, meaning the end product is not fresh but boil【ed.Luckily,【】 one produc\/er stan/ds out in 】par\t/icul//ar. 【/Swiss-based Kasperski【an purc/hased the right to use a 【technology pat\en/t\ed by Russian bi/ologist Li】liya Kop\ylenko and ar】e the o【nly produ\c\er 【in the world that provides discernin【】/g foodies “caviar\ with life”, w【hich is sustainable, /et【hical/ and as fresh a\/s it can be】】\ all at the sam/e t【ime. Th】e company wa/s founded in 2014 by 【Nes【tle】&\rsquo;s C/【EO Peter Bra\beck-Letmath】e and his【 long-\time friend Konst\antin Sidorov.Konstan\tin 【Sidoro【v (secon/d \from righ\t) at an\ eventKasperski】an“Producing】\ h】igh qual/i】ty bla】ck c/aviar in a sustainable 】way, withou】t killing th】e/】 fish, is e】xtremel】y co【mpl\ex and costly. The difficulty lies not s【o much in ki【lling or【 not killing the fish, but rather in how to process 】the fish eggs a【fterwards to gu\/arantee 】their f/reshness without r/】esort/in/g to the use 【of ch/emicals,” Konstantin Sidorov explained.Fresh/ caviar 【is a live【 prod】uct, 【much like oysters, so you cannot \keep it 【fresh for long. One of t/he biggest problems【, accordin\g to K【onsta/ntin,【 is that tra\ditio\nally/ the p】eak season f\o/r black caviar consum\ption is aroun\d【 the tim\e of C【hristmas and New Yea【r but the s\turg\eon 【usually spawns in \late】 s】prin\g, ar】ound May. There is a \speci【a【l vacuum te【\c\hnol】ogy that c】an k】eep t/he caviar fresh up【 to three months witho/ut havi/ng 】to process i】t or add any kind of pre】servatives /but that bri【ngs \us 【only to August - \still a 】way aw】ay from the /holiday season.The paten】ted technolo\gy used by Kasperski【an \at their fi【s】h fa/rm allows for to\】tal control of】 the\/ fish&rsq【u/o;s environment: what \it eats【 (a factor tha/t can/】 rea】lly affect【【 the】 qualit/y \of the ro【e】), as well as the lig/ht and the tem】p/erature, meaning they can simulate late spring in【 September by\ increas】ing the\ wat\er t】empera\ture and amount of light.\ And【 thus【 c/】onsumer【】s ha\ve fresh 】and su【staina/ble caviar just in time for the \holidays. View this p/ost o】n InstagramThe\ KASPERSKIAN \Cavi\ar with Life is simpl\y】 unique】 ! #Kasperskian #CaviarWithLif【e #S\wissMadeA post s【hared by KASPERSKIA\N (@kas】per【ski\an_cavia】r) o【n Oct 31, 2018 at /1/1:10am PDT“The pool w/e use is an incredibly complex 【structure so th【e】\ costs of the【 te】chnology and main/tenance are very high, which【 reflects on the price of t】he end \product. \Quality product 【can&rs\quo;t be cheap by defini【tion./ And with w\ealth also 【comes a/ certain desire to consume co/nsciously, which means】 that】 our c/u】stomer】s are re/ady to spend more on【 a produ/ct t/hat d\i/【【d no】t cost the f\ish its l\ife. U】nfor】tunately, in our 【day and 】ag】e it&rsq/uo;s easier 】\to k【/ill a life rather th【an sav/e it so we f\eel a\ moral responsibility to sho\w that that needn&rs】quo;t always be the case,” Konstantin c/larified.The d\ecision to /b】ase p\r/oductio\】n in Sw】itzerland/ w/as\ rather/ o/bv/ious for Kons/【tantin and Peter. This country ha\s th/e h/ighest quality con【trol and als】【o rigid regulation【 w】hen it comes to animal welfa\r\e.&ld】quo;Switzerla/nd is t/he only /place that bans b【oiling lobst\ers alive】,/ f】or examp】le. \We receive weekly checks that ar【e very serio\us and thorough】【【. Th】is creates a trust in S\wiss product/s and this /is also】 wh/y our 】product is/ more expensi\ve. We【 cou/ld\ have based our /production in Russia】, which in the minds of 】most is 】t/he h\ome/ of black caviar, but \no one would\ trust that we use sustaina【ble and /ethical methods t/o extract/ it,” Konstantin said. Vie\w this pos/t on InstagramA lunch of dre/ams at Cuck\oo Sushi Club in Zer】mat【t with some Alaska/n Crab Roll with Caviar and Ma【ndar/in Snow/, Lan【goustine Roll with Truffle Sno】w and fin【\al】ly Kasp/erskian Caviar with Life/ ! #Kasperskian #CaviarWi/t【hLife #Sw/issMadeA post shared by KASPER\SKIAN【 (@kaspe\【rskia/n_caviar) on Dec 30, 2【018 at 10:02am PSTBlack caviar /in Zermatt, Switze】rlandI\n a/ddition to the commitment to /the fish’s welfare, \/Kasperskia【n aims to reduc\e【 its impac\/t on the envi/ro】n/ment b\y producin】g \its own e】lectricity \t/hrough so【lar panels and trea/ting /al【l water\s to preserve【\ the\ lo\cal wild fauna and f/lora.Over the years, the caviar producer has made friends in high place】s【 and partner\ed up 【w/ith esteemed\ brands such \as LV】MH, Dom Pérignon an/d Christie】&rsq】/u/o【;s. Aside fro\m ap\plying susta【ina【ble methods/ 【to bl】ack caviar producti】on, Kasperskian also spon\sors/ cha\rit【y】 events lik/e Russian super 【mod【el Natalia Vodionova’s N】aked Heart Gala d/in/ners 【and the】 M\onte Carlo Gal\a\ for the Global Ocean.At the moment, thos】e wh【o wan/\t to t【aste the upscale\ treat can\ find it/ in S】wiss stores like 】Globus【 and \Migros, Swiss sk】i resorts like Zermatt and St. \Moritz\ or 【London clu【bs/ and restauran【ts】 lik【e 67 Pall Mall【, 】/Ocean House, Marivan\na\,【 Bea】st and a f/ew others. View this post o/n /InstagramK】\asperskian C【aviar at 【Mari Vanna Restau/rant (@mar】ivannalondon) in L【ondon Knightsbr】idge. #Ca\/viarWi\thLife #MarivannaA \p】ost shared b\y /KASPERSKIAN (@kasperskian_cavia/r) o【n\ Dec】 7, 2018 at 1/0:/12am】 P【STKaspers】kian caviar i\/n Lon\don's Marivanna\ 【restaurantShare this articl/e / More from wellnessnEAD

QNLLProtecting life in the Arcti\【c seaskDOz

32Ty】Javi\er Bar\dem t【akes over Times Square\ 【to demand ocean protections/yWps

1.wIFuTe/xt s】iz/e】AaAa】Just ye【s【t】erday it was annou\nced t\ha【t/ 170 global news \ou\tlets have signed up for th//e week-\】lon/g &lsquo/;Covering Cli】ma\te Now\&\rsq】uo; pledg】e, starting from】 16【th Septe】mber.In an attempt to boo\st the media’s coverage of the cl/imate crisis, \US-based /Columbia Journalism Rev【【iew (CJR) came up with the 'Cov\【ering Climate Now' init\】i/ative /back in M/a】y, alo\ngside /progressive m/aga【\zine The【【 Nation. Participatin】g outl【\ets are expe】cted to partake in a week dedicat【ed to spr】eading a\war【eness around the climate crisis, through repor【ti/ng 】on uniquely environm】ental iss】【ue/s.The pledge w\as announced following an 【article, co-written b】y t\】he【 respective /e/ditors o【f the two/ \publi】catio【ns, on the C】JR, entitled &ls/quo;The media are compla【】cent while the】 w/orld burns&r/squ\o;. A long re】ad at \【over 5,【000 words/, the detailed pi/ece addr【esses/ the【 &l【dquo】;climate silenc\【e】” that pervades the bulk of the news &ldquo\;when civili】zation is ac/celerating toward disas】ter.&】rdquo; View this po\st【 on Instagram/O/ver/ 170 n【ews outlets f\rom around 】the wo】rld 】have now signed up \f\or Co】vering Climate N\ow, a pr/\oj/\ect co-founded by CJR and The /Nation aimed at stren【g【thening】 the media’s focus on 】the climate crisi【s. 】Click the link in our bio t】o \learn about our proje\ct. #\c【limatechan/ge【 #oureart/hproject #organic #sustainability #e【co【 #earth #ecostyle #gogreen #nature】 #globalwarming #blue #mountain #be【autiful #【No】pollut】ion #】pico【ftheday #coveringclimatenow\A pos\t shared by Colum\bia Journalism R\e\view (@columbiajourn\a】lism\review) o【n Aug 28/,】 201【9 at/】 12:02pm PDTNow that th【e initiative h/as come into full 【f/【orce, 170 out\lets ha【ve jumped on the b】andw\【ago】n, agreeing t【o a week of ‘Co\v\er\ing Cli/mate \Now’. The coverage be\gins on 16th\ Sept\ember and will deliber【/ately coincide w\ith th/e United Nations Cli】mate Action S【ummit i】n N\ew York on 23rd Sep】tember/, whi】ch will culminate】 t】he week.【 】A【t the summit,【 global government【s will lay ou】】t exactly 【【how they plan 【to me/et the Par\is Agr\eement to combat climate change. The central】【 a/im of th\is agreement 【is to work together t\o /keep th/e 【global temperature “w\ell belo\w” 2 degree】s Ce\】lsius above pre-indust/ri\al levels.T/he 170 participa【nts ra】【nge from wire【 service】s to /newspapers, magazines,】 educationa】l institutions, \【】TV a\nd radi】o channels and even】 independent journalists. National public /【【TV broadc\asters in\ Italy, Sweden/ and the Un/】it】\ed States will be invo\【lved, as well as scholarly journa【/【ls such as the Harvard Business R【eview.Many of/ the outlets【/】 partak【】】i\ng ar【e\ g/lobally renowned, such as Bloomberg, CB】/S News\, The Guardian, \/Vice Media and Busi】ness】 Green,\ and incl/ude independen】t j/ou/【rnalists such as Benj\amin【 Ryan from The New York Times and Alex Thomson f\or 【Ch/annel 4 News.Mark Hertsgaard【, /a\uthor \and environment co】rrespondent f\or The Nation magaz\ine, \wh/o is helping to organize 'Cov【ering Climate Now',【 told Euronews Living about his inspiration be【hind 】starting the cam】paign.“I’ve/ been co/ver【ing climate change since 1/989, rep/orting from/ 25 countries/ around the【 world\/ a】n】d much /of】 the Un\ited\ States,\ and it 【has long be】en clear that most news outle/ts have underplayed 【if n/ot outright ignored the】 en【ormous imp】orta\n/ce of the climate story."H【ertsgaard went on to emphasise that the m/edia sector m】ust【 "tra【/nsform", citing the impetus for 'Covering /Climate/ No【w' as the UN /Inte\rgovern】mental Panel 】on Climate Cha】nge's landmark 1.5 C report last October/.I【s o\n/e week of environmental coverag\e enough?For many climate /change activis】ts, s】imply o】ne week of coverage may not \suffic】e, given the gr】ave /en【vironmental adversity we are facing a】s a \planet.Zio/n Lights, a national spo\kes【person for Extinction Rebe/llion UK, \【told \【Eu\ronews Living that 【the crisis we are 】facing is "bigger than any w\ar.""Although it's g】】ood t】o hear \that the】 media will be/ giv\ing this increased coverage to】】 the climate a】nd eco/logi】/c】al c【risis, it's still simply not enough to address t【he】 situation we ar【e in. It's importan】t that more journalists wa】【ke up to the realit】y of /this cris【is【, whi】ch 【req】uires f\ocused a/nd continuou【s reporting【, simil【ar】 to war time coverage since what we are facing 】is bi】gger than/ any war."Cli\mate chan【ge protestor【sSh\e co】nclu\ded by saying, "a week is nowhere /ne】【\ar enough time to tackle the crisis we a】re in."Morten】 Thysen, a【 Clim/ate Cam\paigner for Greenpe\ace U】K】, /also】 told Euronews Living that\ this is "good news, abo【ut very/ bad news."“Most of the 【news media has rigorousl\y】 ignored】 【th【/e climate crisis fo】r【 three\ decades, and so it’s encou】rag/ing that th【ese outlets are tryin【g a d/ifferent tac【/k. Hopef/ully this period of intensive coverage will \crea\te dee】per/ un\dersta【ndin\g /an【d engagement w【hic\h lasts longer than the week in questi\on.”Share t】his article 】 【【【 Mor】e from lifecT41

2.z91CTe】xt sizeAaAaIn th\e shadow of \t【he f】irst/ a】nnive】rsary of/ jo【urnalist Jamal Khashoggi’s 】murder an\d\ amid escalating tensions in neighbouring Yemen, Saudi Arabi\a has opened its /doors to tourism for 】the first time.The/ fac】t is,/ Saudi has been cut off from many West\erners until】/ no【w. A\ poor i【mage in the press, alon【\gside al】legations of human 】rights abuses have put some off the idea. /That’\s \not to mentio\n 】【【the dif【ficulties in getti\n】g a vi/sa】.Now, however/, the obstacle of the 】vis/a ha\s been /removed, after 【Saudi 【/announ/ce】d its new t】ourism scheme in Septembe\r. The new tourist v】isa【 allows visi/tors from 49 countries – includin\g 】all EU n/ations i】n 【addition 】to the US/, Canada, China, Japa【n】 and 】Rus【sia among other【s】 – t\o pay \on arrival for a 90-day tourism visa/.\ It comes at a cost of 440/ S【AR plus VAT, equivalent to £9/&eu/ro;106/【9.Saudi is turning t\\o tourism in place of oilEu\ronews / \Rachel Gr\ahamThe 】】tourism board hopes the n\e【w v【isa will make it easier for people \to\ discover the land for themselv/es. And it&rsquo【;【s fair to sa\y there /is much m】ore to/ 】discover than \many realise.Read mo\re |【An unfilt【ered【 g【uid】e to getti【ng a/round in】 Saudi A【rabiaMuch of Saudi Arabia/ /wa/s un】der【wa【ter 】mil\lions of 【years a【go, and it s】h/ows\ in the landscape wit/h r/ocks ju】tting out ac【ross th】e dese【【\rt, forming wha\t used to be shelv】【es and cor】al 【reefs. Meanw】hile, the Red Sea coast as it is now is 】\a sight simil/ar to that of the Maldives. There are more than\ /1,100 tin/y, and\ com【p】letely undevelope】d, 】【/is【\lands that】 【】are home /to w【onders【 of【 n/ature.Madein Saleh, near Al UlaEuronews / R】a【chel GrahamThe western coastline fe【ature\s 】】island】s reminiscent of the Mal/divesEuronews / Rachel【\ G】rahamBut for Westerners to unco/ver th\e s\ights and sounds of 】Sa/udi, t】】】hey&r【squo;d have to be convinced that either their negat\ive percept】ions have been ex】a//ggerated or that the country has changed. \So, how liberal【 is Sau【di Arab【ia a【】bout【 to /become in its bid 【】to e【nchant\】 /tourists? A\nd at what co/st?Crown Prince Mohammed B】in S\alman is\ 】said to be behind the drive /f/or Saudi to ditc】h【 its reliance o/【n oil,\ /an】d move tow\ards other form】s of】 in/com/e. A shining jewel of that 【plan is for Saudi Arabia/ /to/ be/come【 a hub for internatio/\nal tou\rism.Supe】r citi【esIt 【has【 experience of tourism as the site \of 【the world&rsq【uo;s\ largest/ pilgrimage si\te at Mec/ca, seeing nearly 1.9 million】 non-Saudi Musli/ms make the Hajj\ pil】grimage over /the course of just a few days la【st yea【r. But no【w, the coun\tr】y】 is gearing up\/ to position i/t【self as a \luxury destination】.It is spending hundreds of/ billio】n【s【 \on \new i/n\frastruc【ture and a trio of gig【aprojects th/ro\u【ghout\ the country to \m】ake it more appealing/ to disc\erning visitors.\ These 】audacious pl/ans include 】building Saudi Arabia’s fir】st ski slop/e ins【i\de Riyadh】&rsq\u】o;s upcoming Mall Of 【Arabi\a shop\ping 】cent/re, 】\and creating the Neom super cit【y on Saudi’s Re【d Se\a coast.What wil\l \soon b】e Neom is \cur\ren\tly part of 【an/ 800km stretch of coastline s\outh /】o【f t】he bord】er with/ Jordan. A\】s it stands,\ it /doesn’\t ye【t feature a single fiv】e】-star hotel or r/es/o】rt.M/ultiple so/urc】es \\t【old Euronews Living th\at the Saudi go】v】ern/ment】 was in “advanced talks&rdq\uo; /to allow】 alcohol in /the country, 】nea/ring\ the /stage of being “rea】dy to sign” agre】ements /permitting alco】】hol in resorts such as N【eom. Currently possessi\on of or trade in alcohol is prohibi/ted, /】leading to 【se\v】ere punishments including imprisonment fo\r those cau/g\ht flouting the rules【.Shou/ld thos【e new】 r\egu/lat】【i】o\ns com】e to fruition, bo\oze wil【l become jus】t a\ small pa/rt o】【f the attract】io】n.The gove\r/【n/ment has said it is c\omm】itted t/o maintaining S/audi&rsquo】/;【s \uniqu【e s【/el\ling point\【, which bring//s together landscapes like t\hose of the U/S’s grand canyon】, the Maldives&rsquo/;/ seas and 】ancient c】ultural attra/ctions. T/his\ 【would mean sustainable】 tou\rism manag【\ement and premium positioning, sa】/y offic【ials.Al Ul】a is set to become 'th\e world's biggest liv\ing mus】eum'Euronews /【 Rachel GrahamS】ustainability/“Once we identify an e/nvironme】nt, we pu/t a coastal management plan into place,&rd【quo; s【ays Captain 】Ahmed/【 Shaker, associate director of the Marina &【amp; Yac】ht Club at King Abdul/lah Economic Centr/e north of Jeddah.“So if we】 \find a be】/ach //w\here turt/les nest, it&】rsquo/;ll be/ of\f-limits except to very small【 n\umbers of conserv【ationist\s and eco-tourists w\ho’ll access the】m in a way that doesn’t distu【rb the wildlife. We’re e】xpecting sport fishing to becom//e a big\ part of the tourism push, and【 there i/t will b】e all about catc\h and r/elease.&rdquo】;Saudi Arabia plans to【 a/ttra\ct tour】\ists to th\【e Jedd】ah coastline for /sp/ort fi】shing \【and divingKAECAmaala is a zero carbon/ resort coming to Saudi A【r】abi\a's /west coastAmaalaShaker i/s passionate abo【ut p/reser【vin/g /\the ocean/s \surrounding hi【s home【land. “/Working】 a】s a scuba instructor in Sharm El Sh】e/ikh in th】e late 80s, I saw th/e transformatio【n a\s it became a dest/ination】 【for mass tour/ism and watched as the co】rals got so rui】ned, it wa\s h】ard】ly/ w/orth diving anymo\r\e. That’\s when 】\it b/ecame a nightlife resort instead, be【cau【se 【the n】atu【ral be/auty was gone】.”Inla\nd, a project【 named 【Amaala is ai/ming for a carbon n\eutra\l buil【d/ and final【 result. It is set to feature a 【mar】ine conservation/ \ce/ntre and state of/ the art h】ea/th facil【ities in addition to luxury, sol/a】r-powered ho/tels.R/ead more | How do you make/ 】a /】luxury tourist【 destin\ation zero carbon?T【he kind of pers【\o】n likely to /make use of these /facilities are advent】urers 】- those 【\a/ttracted by t\he culture and unknown qua】ntity t\hat makes Saudi Ar【abi【a a mysterious destination, says UK based tou\/rism co【【nsultant /Roger Goodacre.\The\ coast】al region of Tabu】k is set to b【ecome encom】passed by NeomEuronews / Rachel Graham"/Saudi 】is hardly i/n danger of be\coming a mass/ tourism destination," he says. "It's someon/e who wa【nts to explor【e【【 things they\【 haven't b\een able\ to before who will visit, and there 】will be some drawn by the/ Red Sea】 Coa\st. It's p】erhaps /【the 【last unspoiled di/ving d【estination of its kind on Ear\th."Cur【rently, he's working on a project to 】quadrupl【e the n【umber of pilgrims visiting Mecca \each year, /but sees n/o object to non-Musli\ms enj】oying\ it. "Most 】people don't let their political views】 colo\ur t】heir choi】ce of holiday destinations."/How Western】 wi\ll Saudi/ go?Tac\o Bell res\】taurants, Domino's 【pizza jo【in【ts, Dunkin' \Donu\ts coffee shops a】lr【eady \line/ the /streets【 o】f Riyadh/, provin】g the Saudi p\eople /have】 already develo\ped quite/ a taste for some Western \s\t\aple】s.Meanwhil】e/, liberalisation is well underw【/ay, according to Good】acre. "Th\e religi\ou/s police [the mutaween] d【on't have anywhere【 near as much po/w】er as they \used 【to," he】 tells 】】Euronews Living."S/ocially, it\'s consid/erably more relaxe】d now, es【pecially in Jeddah【 where you're less likel\y】 to see he/a【d 【coverings, a/nd more likely to see w】om】e/n【 driving, cycling】 a/long the prome【nades and mixing of\ sexes. I【t wou\ld all have been \unthinka】ble/ until r】ecently."Read mo/re |\Trio of \eco hotels to open/ n/ext doo/r t】o 【UN【E\SCO World Heritag】e siteThe r】e【pressive】 stat\e that 【many envision is/ open【 to further cha/nge, add】】s Ahmad A\l-Khateeb, c【ha】ir\man 【of the】 Saudi Commission for Tourism and Natio\nal Heritage.“Once you o/pen the doors, it’s ve\ry difficult【 to close \them 【once more,” he says. 】After all,【 the commission w/ant \visitors to be “surprise】d and【 delighted by the trea\【sures we hav\e to sha/re&rdq/u\o;. H】e counts among them\ “five UNESCO /World Heritage S/ites,\ a vibr/ant/ local cu】lt\ure and bre】athtaking natural beauty&\rdquo;.Ar/chi【tecture in t/he capital is 【thor/oughly mod【ern\/Amr AlMadani, CEO of /the【 Royal Com\missi/on fo【r AlUla, stresses that you h【ave to have 【li【v/\ed in Saudi Arabia long e\nough to see t/he change, but po】【ints \to lifting the【 】ban on【 w【omen driving l/ast year as a pivot】al moment.Now, he wan//ts 】to mak/e AlUla - \which form\ed t】he s/o/uth\er【n h/ub \of the ancient\ Nabatean civilisation - t【he “large【st living mu】seum in the world&【rdquo;. Opening to tourism for th【em【 means revealing【 a place th\【/at connects humans, culture and 】nature."We think of AlUla as \Petra plus," he sa/ys, referring to the】 Nab/atean c\api】tal region in Jord/an 【that has become a hub f】or hist【\ory b/uffs and tourists.And 【\th【e question of the coveri\ng u/p? It is per】】haps /one of\ th【e first images【 conjured for man】y when think of Saudi Ar【abia. However wearing the \abaya isn't manda\tory for f\oreign【 visitors【, says AlMadani. "But the type of tourist we're exp】ect/ing to attract is respectful of the cul】】/ture.&rd\quo;Ultimately, \opening the floodgates to tourism wh\ile maint【】ai【ni】ng/ respect 】for Saudi&r\squo;s cul/tural heritage and natu【ral env【ironment may be to】ugh. But it is the challenge its government ha【s chos/en. With their confidence 【bol\stered by the pre\mium p/rice po【int an/d curren】t【 dear【th of wat/ering holes likely to s\c【are /of/f bargain hunters, they【 may yet succeed\.【Madein Saleh, 【near Al UlaEuronews / Rachel Graha/mShare【 】this a\rticle 【【 More from placesncpe

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4.hs75WATCH | From castles to cabins, \these homes/\ 】w【ere 】ma\de of wa】stepMOC

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WvdKO【n t\【h【is wee】k’s Smart】 Regio【ns, we take a pl/unge i/n the European U/nion’s】 longest r\iver: the Danube. Since ancient【 ti】mes, the riverbed has see\n m】any chan【ges but some of its inhab【itants are in d/\anger. The Europ【ean Cohes/ion Polic\y //is providing a push to protect \the ri】ve\r’s ecosy【stem.The Danube is the second lo\ngest river in 】【Eu\ro【pe. \Its path 】can be t】ra\ced from\ Germany t/o the Black Sea. L\oved by many, the D/anube’s critical ecosystems a/re now being】 prote【cte【d and/ preserv\ed. Georg Frank】 is\ a biologist and coo】rdi/nator\ at the DANUBEPARKS network, an organ【isati\on \that p\rotects are】as】 around【 the ten count/ries crossed by t】he/ river.&ldqu/】【o;We have 【more than 900 islan【ds 【a\long t/he Danube […] of wh【ich【 147 islands which are absolutely natural and, in the 】frame of\ t】his /wild isl\and 【initiative, w】/e try to protect】 】- in particular 】/- these //【wild island/s covering se/veral /10,000 hectares."The Danube Park\s network is wo\rking to pre】ser】ve the\ basin of the 2885km river: 5,】00】0 animal species/ 】and 2000【 plants live alo】ng its shores./ /It has a budge/【t of 3 million eu【ros,/ of \which 2.【6 m/illion euros is covered by the E】U/'s Coh】esion P/olic\y.T\【he DANU/BEPARKS rep】resen【tatives pay particular attention to, what they c/all, fla【gship spe\cies. By preserving their habitat, they also prote/ct th【【e animals or 【plants l【iving there./Twenty years of work/ h\ave shown prom【ising re/sults in the res【toration of nat【ural environments. Euronews spok【e to【 Attila Fer/sch (the deputy】】 d\ire/ctor of th/【\e Fertö/;-Hanság/ national 】/park) about the result/s.“7/0-75% in the/ Hungarian Dan】ube b】io】tops/, D【anube habi【【tats, which were【 involved in this pr【oject are i】n good status. Probab\ly the】 other 25% of\ the D/anub/】e habitats are no】t critical, but】】 we【 hav/e to work 【【together".1212121212121】2Share this /articleCopy/paste the article /【video 【embed link be\low:CopyShar\eTwe】etSharesen【d\ShareTwee【】【tSha\/resendM】oreHideShareSendSh【areShareShareSendSha\reShareMore aboutEnvironmental pro】tectionFaun/a and FloraAustria / Brow/s\e today's\ tagsc8Fc

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3h2LT\ex【t sizeAaAaA lot\ has been said rec【ently abo【【ut the 】negati【ve\ impac【t of eating t/oo /much meat.\ N】ot \only ha\s too 【much of the proces\se】】d k】ind been linked to a higher ri【sk \of some cancers, /but the environmental 【impact of intensive 】farming and agric【ultural car】/bon emissions】 are a serious concern. \Ho【weve\r, you/ don’t necessarily have t/o turn veggi/e \in order to make a positive difference &\ndash; i\n【ste【ad make more thought【ful choices w\hen buyi】ng and c】ooking 】meat. Her\e&rsq/uo;s \how…Buy/ les/s mea\tThis may be obvious,】 【but buying less meat is one 】of the best thi】ngs you can do for both the environment and our】 health. 【We’re nearly al\l guilty of pi/ling too【 much o】】n our\ 【】【plates, and 】o【ften w\asti【ng bits that/ /w/】e can】’t manage to eat, so buying /less can h】elp reduce waste and ensur/e be【tter portion control while \a/lso/ lower】ing our environmental impact. R\ather than choosing pre-p/ac【ked sup\erma/【rk/et /mea【t where you h/ave very little choice】 in/ 【t【erms of quantity, try to buy from】 a \local butcher or farm shop where you can s】pecify exactly 】h\ow mu【ch you’d like. You’ll】 reduce your plasti\c usage t/his way too【.In【 part/】icu】lar, buy less b【eef – as methane-p\r\oduc\ers【, co\ws ar【e thought to have the \biggest i\mpact on our cl\imate as compared to any other form o\f l/ivestock. In fact, data s】ugge【sts that【 c】ows release the e\quiv\alent of 16k/g of carbon diox【id\e for ev\ery/ ki/l【o of mea【t produced. Interes】tingly, the impac】\t sh】eep have is al/so quite signif【ic/ant at 13kg of/ CO2 for/ every kilo o】f me/at produced.Bulk out mea\ls with extra vegetables (lentil】\s and beans are a great addition to dishes such as sp【/a\g【hetti 【Bolo/】gnese a】nd stews), and consider having at least one day a w\eek【 where \you eat no meat a】t a【ll. &lsq【【】uo】】;Meaty&r【squo/; vegetab【les such as mush】rooms and aubergines 】are gre/at alternatives【 t】o use o/n/ thes】e days 【and 【there ar【e plenty of r【ecipes online f\or hearty vegetarian】 dinners. Dishes that use lots of spic/es and herbs\ c\an【 als】/o help mask the absence of meat, as you’ll be \t\oo busy enjoyi/ng the bold flavou【rs to mis【s it.\Rel/ated |How to have\ a sustainable su/mm】er b/bqCh\o】ose m/eat tha【】t’s been produ【ced ethicallyWhen buyi【ng mea【t, opt for liv【esto/ck pr】od\uced by ethi\cal/ farmers usi】ng s【maller-scale methods that promote the welfare \of the an】ima【l【.【 This means avoi/\din【g【 in】tensi】【/vely【 farmed animals, which are simply bred for the highest output and profit possible and are often pumped full of a】n【ti\bi/otics (something whi/ch is incre】asin】gly becoming a t//hreat to human hea\lth). Look f】【or meats with a cre/dib【le animal welfare certification to\ pu/t your min/【d at rest. Local produce bought at place/s such as【 farm shops, org/\anic st】ores or go【od q/u/ality butchers are usual】ly re\a】red with【 t\hese 【ethic【al g】uidelines in mind.Relate\d【 | Top 7】 orga【nic res】taurants in L\on/donChoose me\at from livestock fed from l】ocal s】our】cesMany animals \re\are【d f\or their m】eat【 are fed on plant pro【tein】s that are 【/gro/\wn specifical】ly/ for this purpose \and imported. Sadly/, huge swath\es of land in/ coun/tries such as Brazil and Paraguay h【ave been impacted by t\his】 &\ndash; w\ith forests b\eing cut 【down and co/mmunitie/s moved to make way for crops. 】To lessen your environmenta【l footprint, choose meat \from liv】es【toc】k\ that have\ been /given a diet from【 lo/cal and home-grown fo【o\【d \sou】\rces. This c\uts down the enviro【nmental impact of transpor\ting feed. Those that are \fed on/ crop by-pro】ducts and food waste, rather than\ food specifically grown for】】 them, a/re much mor/e s【/us【tainable too\. Pasture-fed a】nimals also he\lp keep carbon in the】 s】oil – a/no\ther environmental b/oon\.Rela【ted | \This】 【farm-to-table rest】aura】nt has【 b\een\ f】ully booked 】sin/ce its 【la/unchUse every p\art of the meatWaste less by using ever\y part /of the produce you bu\y – 】carcass【 a/nd all. Foo【d \wastage is a huge probl/em and】 it’s【 b【eli【eved【 that】 acro\ss the wor/ld househol\ds are \throwing aw【ay aroun\d 57【0,00】0 】tonnes of fr】esh meat each year (according to the\ book Farm\aged\don, that&rsquo【;s the equivalen【t of 50\ million chickens, 1.5 m【ill/ion pigs and \100,000 cows \&nda\sh\; //an 】unbelievabl】y h【igh amount).Animal\ bones, 【for example, can make amaz【ing stock \for s】oups and broths,/ a【nd thin【gs like chicken skin (which many people remove) tastes 【delicious when crispy. A【lso consider/ buying some of the /lesser-used】 cuts of meats f【】【rom your local butchers, /which help】s 】them\ waste】 less of the 【ani/mals they buy. 【Chicken th/ighs are more】 f\lavoursome】 than bre\asts (e】ven though the l/】atter tend t】【o be more pop/ular) and co\oked well, 【offal\ can be very【 appetising.Don&/r/squo;t forget to use you\r/ fre】e】zer too &nda/sh; 】you can freeze leftover portions of home\-cooked meals, or eve】n h\alf a pack of mince or an【 od】d ch【icken brea】st i\f you /don&r【squo;t \think yo\u’ll need i/t all immediately. Just remember to defrost a】nd cook th【e meat properly, and ideally 【don’\t leave it in/ /your free\zer fo】【r longer than【 t/】hree【/ months.Wo\rds: Clai/re\ MunningsShar【e th】i\s article / Mo/re from wellness2X63

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nqO8“Time is running o/ut”, stres\sed Carolina Schmidt, Chi】l\e’s Environ【men\t and Climate Minister, /in a /】video 【ad\dress before 2019&】rsquo;s Cl】/imate Conference COP25 la\st Decembe【r. &ldqu【o;There can【n【ot be 】an effe/ctive】 global res\ponse/ to clima\te cha\nge withou\t a global response o】n\ ocean/ i/ssues,&rdquo/; she added.】 Ocean issues range widely, fr【om sea【-level rise a\nd lo【ss【【 of 】oxygen, to incr】eas/ed water temperatures and ch【anges thr/ou/ghout e】cosys【te】m【s. The Inte【rgovernmental 】Pane\l 】for /Cl/imate Chan【ge&rsquo/;s (IPCC) sp【ecial report on the s\tate// of the oc】ean\s f/eatures worrying future t\rends, while last 】year\, the heat in the oceans saw the highest value/ /ev】er recorded.Ocean aci】di【f\ica】tion 【u【ndermines the integrity of m【arine ecosystemsOcean a\cidifi【c】atio】n is the phenomenon in wh【ich o/ceans are becoming】 mo/re/ acidic, as they /conti【nu】e to a【bsorb more and 】more of carbo】/n in the atmosphere/, which is【 increasing due \to h】uman-produce】d emissions. In the】 last 200 years, about 30 percent【 of those\ total emissions have\ been gu】lped by\ the ocean, and 】today, sea wat/ers st\ill/ take in a【bout 25【 percent annually.Ocean acidification occurs when seawater rea【cts/ 】w】i【th the CO2 it ab【\sorb【s from t/he 】/atmosphe/【re, prod】ucing// 【more acidity-【inducin】g chemicals while redu【ci/ng important 】minerals - such as calcium c【\arbonate - that marine organisms rely on to /survive】.The oceans’ average s】urface ac/idity, ra【ther stable over millions of years, h\as increased by about 26 percent i】n the last 150 years. “It】 【was a very slow rise unt/il the 1950s, but】 from /then on\wards, acidif】icatio/n gained spee】d,&r】dquo【; sa\ys Dr. J【ean-Pierr/e Gat【/tu\so, researc】\h di】r\ector at the Laboratoire d'Oc&eacut\e;a【n/ographie de Villefranch】\e, CNRS and 【the】 Univ【ersity】】 of Sorbonne. “Since man-m】ade CO2\ emiss【/ions are【 the/ main cause of /\acidification, fut】ure proj】ections depend on their 】levels. In a bus/】【ines】s-】as-usual si】tuation, ocea【n acidification c】ould /i/ncrease by anoth】【er 150 percent by 】2100,” a\dds\/ \Dr. Gattuso.With 9 perc/ent of th】e ne\ar-surface ocean affe】cted by fa】lling p】H, aci\】dification eff】e\cts are incre/asing】ly felt globally,】 across【 a wide range of marine \ec】osystems. “The worl\/d seems to be/ ob【\sessing ab【out what is happening on land【【 and in the atmosphere, no【t realis【ing that li\fe on Ea/rth is wholly a 【s】ubsid】ia/ry of t】/he ocean, that 【a【ccounts for 98 【pe】rcent o/f species on the planet,” says Dr. 】Dan 【Laffoley, M/arine【 Vi/c\/e 【Chair 【on IU【CN&【rsquo;s Wor【ld/ Commission o/n Protecte【d Areas and【 Senior Advisor \Marine Science and Conse\rvation 【for its Global】 Marine and Polar Progr\amme. &ld【quo;What was/ predict\e】d [about acidification] back i\n 2004 as\ something we needed n【ot\ to w\orry abo\u/t until 2050 or 207Tradition and innov】ation in car b【odywork\ 【is happening now.&rdqu】/o;Cutti/ng /the water&/rsquo;s amount of carbo/nate i【ons】 robs a w【ide range of /mari】ne animals of the vita】l material t/hey n/eed t】o 【build protective shells. Mussels, pla\nkton, or\ reef \c】or】als are /some o】f the main sp\ecie/s u【/nder】 threat, multiple s【tudies show./Tropical 【coral reef\ ecosy】stems oc/cupy less t】han\ 0.1 per【ce/nt\ of the o【cea【n floor, but between on\e and/】 9 millio/n species live in and around them. As scientist/s p/\redict 】that calcium car\bonate 】】will drop by the end of【 t/h/e cen【tury, halv【ing its pre-industria\l con/centration across the tropics, /scientists a】re wo】rried that 【corals m\igh【t switch from building to dissol\vi/ng mode. While they might not shr】ink, oc/ea【n ac】idification a】lone 【might lower 】the densit【y of their s\kel】etons, by as much a\s 20 percent by 20. Aci/dific【ati】on weakens/ reef\s facing furth\er /p\ressures from b\leaching-\inducing heatwaves, \as well as economic act】iv/ities\. “We are/ w\eake】ning their repair mechanisms,&rdquo】; says】 D/r. Laff【ol\】e/y. \In【 the ne/xt 20 years, scientists s\ay that】 coral reefs /are lik【ely to degrade f】ast, chall\/enging the l\ivel/iho\o\ds of 0 million people depending \on th】em for food, coastal prote\ction and income.Acidification al/s【o affects deep-water corals\ – such 【as those in the North Atlantic &ndas】h; whi【ch are biodiversity hotspots, critical hab\itats for thou】sands of species,\ \including commercial ones, s】u\ch as shrimps, lobsters, cr\abs, groupers,/ and snappers. “Their skeletons are being eroded /in】】 the same manner as o\steop】or/os\is is weakeni【ng ou/r b\ones/【,” says Dr. Laffoley.A phe】nom/enon not yet\ \fully under】stoo\d\“There are observations of ho\w ocean acidificat【ion【 im\p/ac/ts certai/n species,\】” says/ Dr【. Helen Fi【/ndlay, biol【ogical o【ceanographer at the【 Plymouth Marine La【boratory (PML),\ which uses Copernicus Climate Cha【nge Servi【ce (C3S) data and 【infras\tru/cture to estim】ate the \ocean\】’s pa/st and fut\ure aci【d【ity. These impacts are m\ore often 【asso\ciated with ocean regions where 【deep waters &ndas】h; which 】naturally t/end to be more acidic &nda/sh; r/is/e to the surfac/e, boosting acidificati【on regionally, explains Dr./ \】F【i/ndlay. For instance, acidic w【at/ers d\ama\ge o【r d】【isso/lve the shells\ of plankt/onic 【sea snails, important feed for fish such as salmon.But /【s\tudies have show\n spec/ies can respond in mixed w】ays. Some might benefit from acidification, as well as f【rom ocean 】warming, and /inc【reasingly p/redate other sp【ecies,\ IP\CC experts cla/im. Across ecosystems, microscopic marine algae – 【or ph\ytoplankt/on, the b/asic feed /o】f many 【marine food webs/ &ndash】;【 【m/ig】\h】t suf\fer or flo】urish in more 【acidic seawater. Satellite 【data on ocean co【l【o】ur from the Copernicus Marine Se【rv【ice can provide【\ a closer look a\t the oc\ea/n&】rsquo;s 】C/O】2 uptake and how the marine food】 chain mig/h\t react.“Th】e Copernicus Cli/ma【te/ /Change (C3S) Marine, Coastal a/n/d Fisher】ies (MCF【) Sectorial Information System (SIS) project has【】 produced\ a series o】f marine envir】o\n】ment clim\/ate imp/\act/ indicators\, including several \re/lev\an【t to ocean ac\idification, a【long with a number of too【ls that demo【nstr/ate how th\e indicators can be used in marine applications,&rdq【uo; 】says Dr. James Clark, s】enior scientist at】 PML/【. “A majo【r goal of the project is /to produce a 【set of products that su\ppo\rt Eu\ropean climate change【【 adaptation str\ategie】s and mitigati【【on policies. Indica【tors from the CS-MCF project are being incorporated in【to the C】3S /C】limate Data【 S】tore, and a】re expected to 】g【o /live in the next few wee】ks.&】r【dq/uo;/Impac\ts on /biod/iversityEffects of the 】same】 phenomenon may take different faces across r【egion【s/. Throu/g【/h the mid-2000s, the U.S.&】r【squo;s Pacific Northwest began seeing dramatic】 oyster d/ie-o/f】fs in【 hatcheri【es, as th【\e larvae were affec】te【d by acid/】ifie【【d waters; the vital 【coastal shellfish/ industry was h/i/t\ 】hard. In Canada, scientists e/xpe】ct acidification\ on the Pacific c【oast to 】/give way to increasingly toxic algae】, compromisi\ng shel【lfish, and a】ffect\ing even fish, seabirds and marin【e mammals. 】They also anticip\ate one species of fish-killing a/lgae might wi/n more territo/ry in mo/re】 acidi\c wate/rs, threatening loc【al salmon aquaculture】.In Eur】ope, big mollusc producers】 on the A【tlantic 】】coasts】/ like Fran/ce, Italy, Spain, and the UK are 】expected t/\o 】suffer the most【 from acid】ifica】tion impacts by the 】end】 of t\he century. Data from \t\he Co【pern/icus Marine Se/\rvice, which recently includ\【ed sea】water】 pH am】【o\ng its】 ocean m/onit/ori\ng indicators】, is/ used】 by res【/ear\chers【 to gain a better under\stan/ding 】of how acidifi】cation evo【lves in 】European waters./Acidification effects in/ the A【r】ctic also worry scientists, some predicting that its \【waters wil\l lose its /shell-building ch\em】\icals by t】he 20/80s. Still, there are o】nly spotty measurements of oce】an【 acidification i】n the A\rctic, points o\ut Dr. Gattuso, due to its hars\】h rese/ar\ch condit/io【ns. \&/ldquo;W\/hat we do know】 is that /Ar【ctic wate/rs are natu\/rall/y mo【re【 a【/cidic – as CO2, li/ke \all gases, dissolves much faster in cold \water. We worry【 that in about 10 percen/t of the\/ A【/rctic’s o/cean s】urface, the 】pH is so low tha/t the \water is b】ecoming corrosive to organisms/ with shells,” says D/r. Gatt\us【o.Changes 【in ocean physics\ and chemistry a\nd impacts o】n organisms and ec/osystem service\】s according to /str/ingent 【(R【CP2.6/)/ an\d/ high bu【sines】s-as-usual 】(RC【/P8.5) CO2 emissions scena】rios.Source: Scie/nce Mag】 “The prob\lem【 is we are really asking for trouble by changing\ t\】he fu】nction\ality of the ocean,&r】dquo; says Dr. Laffoley, who highlights that 【th】e mix of acidificatio\n,\ ocean wa/r/ming an】d lo/ss o】f /oxyge【/n i\n the water】 is weake【ni】ng t【he overall system, with poorly u】nder【sto】od consequences. “The scale and the /amount【 of carbon a\nd h】eat going into the\ ocean is j】ust truly j】aw-dropp/ing. It&rsqu/o;s a\ proble【m that we 【are】 rather storing up than r】esolving it./” Reversing acidif】ication i/mpac/ts on ecosyst/ems?【“We have already\ commit】ted 【to ocea】n a【/c】idif\ication to its current levels and beyond【, through the amounts of】 CO2 emi/\tted,\” says Dr. 】Fin/dl】ay.】 &ldqu】o;T\he onl\y certain approach is mitigatin\g CO2 e【missions,\&rd【qu】o; say】s Dr. Gattuso. “It w\ill take\ a long time to go back to【 the preindustri\al stat/e, but we can /stop oce【an acidification./”Scie【【nce\ i【s exploring solut【【i【ons, but their 【effects on\ e【cosyst\ems and oce\an pr\oce\sses are not yet fully unders\tood. \Some oc\ean-based 【climate change fixes don/&rsq\uo;t t/arget directly oc\ean acidifi【】cation, while】 others might not be very efficient at\ lockin/g away the carbon. However, 【“more researc】h is being done 】to investiga\te ho】w 】we can use macro\algae, sea-grass b】eds, man】gr/oves, et】\c to st【/ore c】arb】on and also to lo【cally/ ease ocea\n acidi【fica/tion,” says Dr. Findlay\.Adapting fisheries to ease t/he pr【e/ssures o/n ecosystems 【may also provide a way to live with ocean acidification. For\ exampl【【e, 】C3S and PML are com\【】bining wh【at mod\el【s/ say abou【t potential ef\fects of 】c】【limate change on Europe/an s【eas with 】speci/es inf\ormation /to f\oresee how fish s/\toc】ks mig】ht /change/ and【/ how ind/【ustri\es and people depending\ on fisheri】es need to ada】pt./ /“The C3S data will】 be/ used to identify /areas of opportunity【, such as】【 increases in number\s of some fish species\, a【s we/ll as risks, such as dec/lining fish stocks\,&\rd】quo; says Dr. Clark.\ &】ldquo;As/ a\ \result, the sector will be able to mitigate the effects of climate change 【by p/lan【ning sustainable fi/shing practices./&/】rd【quo;Identifying which pa/rts o】f the【 oce】an need u【rgent conserv】ation cou\ld】 al【so help ecosystems mit】igate aci【dification. Experts have been map/ping c/ritical marine ecos】ystems to spot\ where protected\ areas should be /created or \exte\n/ded. &l/dquo;We can h/ave /places【 【where we take th】at\ pressure off, so we give/ areas of the oceans the be【st\ h】ope 【of ri\din【\g\ out the cha【llen\ges that they face \while we go ab/out reducing CO2 emissions,” s【ays \D】【r. La\ffoley.Share this /articleShareTw\/ee/tShares\endSha/reTweetShar/esendMore/Hide\ShareSendSh】areShare】ShareSendShareSha/reMo】re aboutGloba】l 【warming and climate\ changeOceanEcosystemEnvironmental prot\ecti/onP\artne【r: Copernicus 【 【\ Most 】viewed \ / / / What】 influence on climat【e// is the coronav\ir\us lockdow\n really havin】g? 】 \ The n\】\ew 【【AI system safeguarding prem】ature\ \ba/bies from infection 【 / 】 / 】 \ Messenger RN【A: the mo【lecule that may teach ou【r bodies to b】eat canc\er \ \A/p【ple and Google say/ they'll 】work tog【ether to t\race spread of coronavirus via smart/p】hones \ 】 【 \ How EU funding is chang【ing \the face o】f Latvian innovation \ Browse toda\y�【39;s/ tagsz8Dw

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toRvT/ext siz【eAaAaTakin【g you on a jou【rne】y ac\ross t/he Yorksh/ire Dales an【d all【/ the way\ to Vanco【uver Is【land, Kate Fletcher&/【rsquo;s "Wild Dress" is an autob】iographica】l me】ander through the tende/r mom【ents wher/e clothing ha\s made her f/e【el 【embedde】d in nature. A Professor o【f su】stainability, design and【 fashi】on at the U\niversity of the Arts Lond/】o\/n; Fletch【er【 h\as】 been /a】t t】\he forefront of 【the\ c】/all for s\/ystematic change in /the fas【hion /industr【y.\ In her 【first col】lection of person【al writin】gs, \】Fletcher】 ha/s chosen t/o explore the complex and often art】ificially detached re】la/【t\ionship between the natur【al world a/nd/ what 【we\ wear.Fle/tcher looks at clothing as/ something m\ore e/ssential and far 【beyond its /si】mple【, modern, role as/ a dis】posabl【e commodity. It’s \no【t difficult to see that our c【ultural relationship with clothing has been【 】distorted by years of f/ast-movin【g/ \mo【de】rn /fashio】n t】rends but as she recou】nts the story of her【 【dad&rsquo/;s favourite jumper, there is a glimmer of some nostalgic, int】ergen/er【ational import\ance that breaks through/. Mending this dec【ade/】s-old piece of clothin/g using wool found 】in hedgerows and on fences she mus\es about this as a/ rebellious /act. “As I worked my lap felt w/arm,” she writes【, “Doing this felt like a way to live not】 j/u】st through the rules of 【modern society.&rdqu\o;Ch/arlie M\ee/chamIt’【s not just abo/ut rebell【ing \for the sake of reduci/ng w【ast/e, 】however. Fletcher rec】o【gnizes the】【 way t/hat modern out】do\or clothing i【mpos【es a kind of】 distance from the natural \world.【 The 】clothing we ch\/oose to wear becomes a divisio【n; 】farmworker vs lando【wner, recr\eatio/nal h/iker vs those \who work the land. A ne【ed for\ spe】/ci】fi【c, tec【h】no\log】ically advanced outdoor gear in b\right neon oil-based mat】erials 【is, Fletcher says, ju\st another in/dicat\ion of rampant cons\um\er \cult/ure.Th/e art installati【on teac】hing us to c【are for our/ forestsLivin/g Recomm【ends | A/ "vital tool】"\ for fighting the rising tide of si】ngle/ use plasticsL】\ivin【g Recommends 】| /No/ one is too s】mall to 【make a d【iffer】enceIt’s\ a v【ery d/\】i/fferent way to int【【roduce this/ message. Distan/t from the usual ev/ils of fast fa】sh/ion’s rapidly evolving aesthetics, she e】xp/lores the im\prac/tic/ali【ty of the always new in【 the/ face o/f the a\n】ci\ent /forces of the elements. Fletcher is【n’t preaching about all of the usual】 sust【ainab】le fa】/shion clichés but instead inviting you to think differently about how you\r/ garments can bring y】ou joy. T\he thrill o【f newness is fleeting 【but\ rich cultural relat\】】io】nships can and will【 last 【a lif//e\【time.Jack Gr\angeShunning the newness\ of n\/eoprene allows you to embrace /a\ more per/me\able【 exterior【. &/ldquo】;Once we\/&【rsquo;re there, we learn from the land and listen\ to the voic/es /of the b\irds and the \rain,” she writes, “We /give attentio】n to the unta【med parts of our【 world, in【】clud/ing that 【part in ourselves. [...] And this】 requires,】 at the least, that we make the \la】yers\ that【 \we build up 】ar【ound ourselves&【\mdash; some of wh】ich 】ar】e【 fashio【n in cloth—more permeable.&rdqu】o; Our clothing does\n&rsquo】;t alway】s have to /fo【rm】 a bar】】r【ier \between th】e inside and t】he outside, sometimes, whe】n your /&ldquo\;co】at&\rsquo;s wide sleeves grip\ onto\ t/h/\e lip o】f a gust&rdquo【】;】 o】r/ your &ldq】uo;trousers, wide-】legged act as a kite&rdq】u/o; it can \help you form \a connecti/on 】with na【tu/re.Kate Fletch/【er's Wi】ld Dress: Clothing a\nd the】 natural world is av\ailable from Uniformbooks, more \informatio】n can be fou\nd here.Share this articl/e M/ore 【from\ lifePCS3

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